Promising UCLA program “PEERS” to Improve Social Skills in Preschoolers, Adolescents, and Young Adults (Autism, ADHD, anxiety, depression, and other socioemotional problems.

peers

UCLA PEERS ® CLINIC

The Program for the Education and Enrichment of Relational Skills (PEERS®) was originally developed at UCLA by Dr. Elizabeth Laugeson, Founder and Director of the UCLA PEERS® Clinic, and Dr. Fred Frankel in 2005 and has expanded to locations across the United States and the world. PEERS® is a manualized, social skills training intervention for youth with social challenges. It has a strong evidence-base for use with adolescents and young adults with an autism spectrum disorder but is also appropriate for preschoolers, adolescents, and young adults with ADHD, anxiety, depression, and other socioemotional problems.

SERVICES:
  • PEERS® for Adolescents: We offer a 16-week evidence-based social skills intervention for motivated adolescents in middle school or high school who are interested in learning ways to help them make and keep friends. For more information, please visit the PEERS® for Adolescents section.
  • PEERS® for Young Adults: We offer a 16-week evidence-based social skills intervention for motivated young adults (18-35 years old) who are interested in learning ways to help them make and keep friends, and to develop romantic relationships. For more information, please visit the PEERS® for Young Adults section.
  • PEERS® for Preschoolers: We offer a 16-week evidence-based social skills intervention for children diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder between 4 to 6 years of age who have difficulty in their peer interactions and friendships. For more information, please visit the PEERS® for Preschoolers section.

Director: Elizabeth Laugeson, Psy.D.

Site: Semel Institute/NPI

PODCAST-

RESOURCES

From the Director Dr. Laugeson-

 

 Role play videos for social skills.

Conversational Skills

  Trading Information (Example 1)
  Trading Information (Example 2)
  Don’t be a conversation hog
  Don’t be an interviewer
  Don’t get too personal at first
  Don’t police
  Don’t tease
  Don’t be argumentative
  Don’t brag
  Use good volume control (bad example: too loud)
  Use good volume control (bad example: too quiet)
  Use good body boundaries (bad example: too close)
  Use good body boundaries (bad example: too far away)
  Use good eye contact (bad example: no eye contact)
  Use good eye contact (bad example: staring)

Starting Individual Conversations

  Starting an individual conversation (bad example)
  Starting an individual conversation (good example)

Entering Group Conversations

  Entering a group conversation (bad example)
  Entering a group conversation (good example)

Exiting Conversations

  Exiting when never accepted (bad example)
  Exiting when never accepted (good example)
  Exiting when initially accepted and then excluded (good example)
  Exiting when fully accepted (bad example)
  Exiting when fully accepted (good example)

Electronic Communication

  Exchanging contact information (bad example)
  Exchanging contact information (good example)
  Beginning phone calls (bad example)
  Beginning phone calls (good example)
  Ending phone calls (bad example)
  Ending phone calls (good example)
  Leaving voicemail (bad example)
  Leaving voicemail (good example)

Appropriate Use of Humor

  Giving a courtesy laugh (bad example)
  Giving a courtesy laugh (good example)
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 1
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 2
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 3
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 4
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 5
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 6

Appropriate Use of Humor

  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 7
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 8
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 9
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing with) 10
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 1
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 2
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 3
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 4
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 5
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 6
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 7
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 8
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 9
  Pay attention to your humor feedback (laughing at) 10

Good Sportsmanship

  Don’t cheat
  Don’t be a referee
  Don’t be a coach
  Don’t be competitive
  Help and show concern if someone is injured
  Suggest a change if bored
  Don’t be a bad winner
  Don’t be a sore loser
  Being a good sport (good example)

Get-Togethers

  Beginning a get-together (bad example)
  Beginning a get-together (good example)
  Ending a get-together (bad example)
  Ending a get-together (good example)

Handling Arguments

  Responding to a disagreement (keep cool, listen)
  Responding to a disagreement (keep cool, listen, repeat)
  Responding to a disagreement (keep cool, listen, repeat, explain)
  Responding to a disagreement (keep cool, listen, repeat, explain, say sorry)
  Responding to a disagreement (keep cool, listen, repeat, explain, say sorry, solve the problem)
  Bringing up a disagreement (wait, keep cool, ask to speak privately)
  Bringing up a disagreement (wait, keep cool, ask to speak privately, explain)
  Bringing up a disagreement (wait, keep cool, ask to speak privately, explain, listen)
  Bringing up a disagreement (wait, keep cool, ask to speak privately, explain, listen, repeat)
  Bringing up a disagreement (wait, keep cool, ask to speak privately, explain, listen, repeat, tell them what you need)
  Bringing up a disagreement (wait, keep cool, ask to speak privately, explain, listen, repeat, tell them what you need, solve the problem)

Handling Teasing

  Handling teasing (male example)
  Handling teasing (female example)

Handling Rumors and Gossip

  Spread the rumor about yourself (bad example)
  Spread the rumor about yourself (good example)

Dating Etiquette

  Talking to a mutual friend
  Flirting with your eyes (bad example)
  Flirting with your eyes (good example)
  Ask them if they’re dating anyone (bad example)
  Ask them if they’re dating anyone (good example)
  Giving compliments (bad example)
  Giving compliments (good example)
  Asking someone on a date (bad example)
  Asking someone on a date (good example)
  Accepting rejection (bad example)
  Accepting rejection (good example)
  Turning someone down (bad example)
  Turning someone down (good example)
  Beginning a date (bad example)
  Beginning a date (good example)
  Two offer rule
  Ending a date (bad example)
  Ending a date (good example)
  Handling sexual pressure from a partner (bad example)
  Handling sexual pressure from partners (good example)
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