A Kid’s Guide to Coronavirus via American Psychological Association (APA)

https://www.apa.org/pubs/magination/kids-guide-coronavirus-ebook.pdf

The APA posted this children’s book about COVID 19.

A Kid’s Guide to Coronavirus (PDF)

By

Rebecca Growe, MSW, LCSW and Julia Martin Burch, PhD illustrated by Viviana Garofoli

Magination Press • Washington, DC American Psychological Association

You probably already know a lot about different ways to be sick. You may know about colds, when you cough and sneeze a lot. You may know about strep throat, when it hurts to swallow, or ear infections, when your ear hurts inside.

What other ways to be sick do you know about?

Most sicknesses have been around for a long time. Scientists and doctors and all the grown-up helpers know just what to do to make people get better.

Can you think of some things that help people when they are sick?

This book is about a certain sickness. It’s called COVID-19, or coronavirus.

Have you heard of it?

Grown-ups have been talking about it a lot. You may have heard about it on TV or online.

What do you know about it already?

A lot of kids have questions about coronavirus. And without getting good answers, they might feel confused or even scared.

This book will help answer those questions!

This coronavirus is a new sickness. Grown-ups don’t know as much about it as they’d like. But here is what they do know:

Coronavirus is contagious. That means it can get people sick by moving from one person’s body to another person’s body when they touch or spend time close together. Coronavirus can move from you to someone else before you even start to feel sick.

Many people who get sick with coronavirus have a fever, a dry cough, and a little trouble breathing.

Anyone can get sick from coronavirus. It can cause big problems for older people or people who have other health issues.

Because coronavirus is such a new sickness, doctors and scientists are working really hard to learn how to help people get better and make coronavirus go away.

In fact, everyone can help out! You can do a lot to stop coronavirus from making people sick.

Can you think of any things you already do to make a difference?

You can wash your hands often with soap and water. Some people sing the ABCs while they do it—what about you?

You can also cover your coughs and sneezes with your elbow or a tissue and try not to touch your face a lot.

You can find fun ways to help, too.

Maybe you could paint a picture for your friend, or make a movie of your new dance moves to give Grandma a giggle.

You could write funny jokes on the sidewalk for your neighbors to see, or hang a sign in your window to brighten someone’s day.

Until scientists have found out how to make coronavirus go away for good, you and your family might have to make some other, bigger changes.

You might need to stay away from crowded places. This is because crowds make it easy for coronavirus to spread to more people and make them sick.

For the same reason, your parents might not work as much, or they might try to work from home. You might not be able to go to school or play with friends.

You might see people wear masks when they go outside. You might even get one of your own.

Super-heroes wear masks to protect their secret identities, right?

Now super-people everywhere are wearing masks to protect each other from coronavirus. Feel free to wear a cape, too!

These bigger changes can be hard.

What do you think some hard parts might be?

These bigger changes can be kind of nice.

What do you think some nice parts might be?

You should know that these bigger changes are temporary. That means they will not last forever.

Other things are staying exactly the same! Your grown-ups are still in charge of taking care of you. And it is still your job to be a kid, which means you still need to learn, play, and spend time with family.

What else is staying the same?

And if you ever have questions, or want to talk, your grown-ups are here to help you and to listen.

No sickness can ever change that!

The coronavirus pandemic can be frightening and confusing for children and adults alike. As a parent or caregiver, you have the challenging task of navigating and managing your own emotions and needs during the crisis while also supporting your child. The following tips offer information and concrete strategies that you can start using right away with your child and on your own.

Provide Just Enough Information

It is natural for children to be curious about

the new kind of illness they keep hearing adults discuss. Provide your young child with limited, age-appropriate facts about the virus. Focus on what they can do to keep themselves, their families, and their communities safe.

The information covered in this book is an appropriate example of how to talk with young children about the virus. Listen respectfully to their concerns and reassure them without being dismissive. Help them focus on what is in their control, such as social distancing and hand hygiene. Emphasize that it’s important they still do their “jobs” as a kid, including learning, playing, and spending time with family.

It is important to try to strike a balance between oversharing information, which may lead kids to worry about facets of the crisis they do not need to be concerned about, such as the economy, and under-sharing. Though parents sometimes withhold information from kids with the noble intention of wanting to spare them distress, too little information can send active

imaginations into overdrive, leading kids to concoct far scarier outcomes than what’s realistic.

Validate and Name Emotions

It is normal for children to have a range of emotions in response to the pandemic. Some children might feel anxious about the unknown and fearful about their safety. Others will feel sad or angry about canceled events like a vacation, or about losing their normal routine and time with teachers and friends. No matter the emotion, it is important to validate it, or in other words, to communicate to your child that their emotion makes sense and is okay for them to feel. For example, you might say, “It makes sense that you are feeling disappointed about missing your class field trip. You were really looking forward to it.” Or, “I can understand why you’re feeling worried. There are a lot of changes happening right now.” It is also helpful to specifically label the emotion your child is feeling; research demonstrates that naming an emotion decreases its intensity. In a difficult moment, taking the time to say, “I see that you are really sad” can be incredibly soothing to your child.

Parents sometimes try to make their children feel better by pointing out that the child has many privileges, and that other people are suffering more. For example, a parent might say, “Don’t feel sad about missing vacation! We’re lucky to have somewhere to live. Other kids aren’t that lucky.” Despite the good intentions, this is not a helpful approach, as it confuses children about why they are feeling what they are feeling. It can also lead them to feel ashamed for feeling sad about missing vacation. If you would like to teach your child to reflect on what they have to be grateful for, make a family practice of writing down “gratitudes” or discussing what you are each thankful for over dinner. By doing this when your child is calm rather than feeling sad or fearful, you teach them that their “gratitudes” are things to feel uncomplicated joy about, rather than guilt or confusion.

Focus on the Present Moment

Worried brains tend to focus on the future, predicting all of the scary things that might happen. Teach your child how to gently bring their mind back to the present moment by practicing mindfulness. Being mindful simply means that you are purposefully paying attention to the present moment without judging it as good or bad. Mindfulness can be practiced in countless kid-friendly ways. For example, you can play a mindful “I spy” in which you count all of the objects of a certain color in the space around you. You can mindfully eat, dance, walk, listen to music – the sky is the limit! Build times into the day to practice, such as in transition periods or at meals.

Create a New Routine

It can feel next to impossible to maintain a routine during the quarantine. Yet, flexibly following a consistent plan day-to-day provides much-needed stability for your young child. This is particularly important given that their world has changed dramatically in a short time. Routines do not have to be complicated. For example, it can be helpful to just structure the day around basic needs such as wake-up times and bedtimes, meals, and periods in which you get active. Constructing a routine around these building blocks of physical and mental health makes it more likely that they will occur consistently.

Consider giving your child age-appropriate tasks to help the family, such as setting the table, helping to prepare food, or cleaning up after a meal. Though teaching your child a new skill takes more effort and attention in the short term, it will make your life easier (and increase your child’s level of independence and sense of competence) in the long term.

Create Memories

Look for opportunities to create new, special family rituals. These do not have to be time consuming or involve preparation. For example, you can jump-start your days with a family dance party in which a different family member chooses a song each day and everyone dances around the breakfast table. You might also help your children brainstorm ways that they can give back to their community, such as writing cards for the elderly or creating supportive signs for health-care workers. When your children look back on this time, they will remember that, despite the many challenges, the time at home also allowed your family to create memories together.

Put the Oxygen Mask on Yourself First

Whenever you can, pause and take a moment or two to check in on yourself and your emotions.

Just like your child, you will reduce your own emotional intensity by noticing and labeling your feelings. During a crisis, this kind of self-attention can feel like the last thing a busy parent or caregiver has time for. However, by ensuring that you are attuned to and taking care of your own needs, you will have reserves available to help support your children during difficult moments. You will be grateful that you preemptively invested the time in yourself when you must draw on these reserves to help a struggling child.

Make a point to practice what you preach with your children. Focus on what is in your control, such as practicing and modeling coping skills, limiting news consumption, and creating your own new routines around sleep, nutrition, and exercise. Most important–validate and be gentle with yourself. It is impossible to perfectly fulfill all of the roles you are being asked to play in this moment in time. Get comfortable with being good enough. This may look like allowing your children more time on screens than you would normally, cooking (or just heating up!) very basic meals, or practicing a coping strategy for two minutes while hiding in the bathroom.

When to Seek Help

If your child is experiencing so much anxiety or sadness about COVID-19 that it causes significant distress or begins to impact their functioning (e.g., consistent trouble sleeping, eating, or engaging in typical life activities), you should consult with a licensed psychologist or other mental health professional. There is no need to wait until social distancing restrictions are lifted. During the current crisis, many mental health providers are offering therapy over virtual meeting platforms. The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges for children and adults alike. Yet within great challenges lie opportunities for growth, bravery, and resilience. You are taking a concrete, effective step forward simply by taking the time to read this book and reflect on how to help your child. Remind yourself of this whenever the “not good enough” monster strikes. You are doing the best you can, and that is enough.

Rebecca Growe, MSW, LCSW, is a clinical social worker with a private practice. She specializes in treating child and adolescent anxiety disorders, disruptive behavior, and traumatic stress. She lives in St. Louis, Missouri.

Visit http://www.growecounseling.com

Viviana Garofoli earned her degree in fine arts in 1995, and since then has dedicated her time to illustrating children’s books. She has illustrated over 20 children’s books and contributed to many editorial and textbook illustrations around the world. She lives in Buenos Aires.

@vivi_garofoli

Julia Martin Burch, PhD, is a staff psychologist at the McLean Anxiety Mastery Program at McLean Hospital in Boston. Dr. Martin Burch completed her training at Fairleigh Dickinson University and Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. She works with children, teens, and parents and specializes in cognitive behavioral therapy

for anxiety, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and related disorders. Outside of her work at McLean, Dr. Martin Burch gives talks to clinicians, parent groups, and schools on working with anxious youth.

Magination Press is the children’s book imprint of the American Psychological Association. APA works to advance psychology as a science and profession and as a means of promoting health and human welfare. Magination Press books reach young readers and their parents and caregivers to make navigating life’s challenges a little easier. It’s the combined power of psychology and literature that makes a Magination Press book special.

Visit maginationpress.org @MaginationPress

Copyright © 2020 by Magination Press, an imprint of the American Psychological Association. Illustrations © 2020 by Viviana Garofoli. All rights reserved. Except as permitted under the United States Copyright Act of 1976, no part of this publication may be reproduced or distributed in any form or by any means, or stored in a database or retrieval system,

without the prior written permission of the publisher. Permission is granted to download and print or reproduce for personal, educational, and non-commercial use only.

Magination Press is a registered trademark of the American Psychological Association. Order books at maginationpress.org or call 1-800-374-2721.

Book design by Rachel Ross

eISBN: 978-1-4338-3415-8

Social Emotional skills taught by Mr. Parker

Mr. Parker's Lessons

Mr. Parker is a School Psychologist who has creatively published a series of Social-Emotional videos on YouTube. He uses music and songs to help teach vital social-emotional skills. Here is a link to his website: HERE

Mr. Parker’s Videos

Empathy: An important tool, now more than ever

Paying Attention: Help children be fully alert and present in the moment

I Messages: Help children effectively communicate their feelings

Feelings: Emotions are a natural part of the human experience

Perspectives: The world may look much different when we put ourselves in another’s shoes

Worries: Help children understand a feeling that is likely to be common during the pandemic

Paraphrasing: Help children listen to understand rather than listen to respond

Happiness: What brings us you?

HEARS Method: Help children show empathy and active listening skills

Getting Started: Help children understand the importance of taking initiative

Anger: The human emotion that we must all learn to manage

Triggers: Help children understand the factors that contribute to their emotions

Expressing Your Feelings: Help children make positive choices when they experience various emotions

Consequences: Help children engage in thoughtful behaviors

Deep Breathing: A healthy coping tool for children in times of stress

Calming Down: Help children learn emotional regulation strategies

 

 

More COVID 19 Family and Educator Resources

Family/Educator Resources

Social-Emotional Support for Students

Social Stories

  • The Yucky Bug – Link
  • My Coronavirus Story – Easterseals – Link
  • Time to Come In, Bear: A Children’s Story about Social Distancing – Link
  • YouTube Channel with various social stories – Link
    • The New Rules of Keeping My Body in the Group and Out of the Group
    • The Rules of Wearing a Mask
    • Rules! Rules! Rules! Rules for Learning Online!
    • When My Parents are Working From Home
    • My Home is My School
  • Video Chatting – A New Way to Communicate Link
    • Social story to describe video chatting, related emotions, and conversation starters

Social-Emotional Learning 

  • Social Thinking – Free Stuff to Use and Home and School – Link
    • Free resources on social skills and how to teach them! 
      • Read Aloud Books and Thinksheets
      • Video Lessons
      • Free Articles 
      • Free Webinars and Aha! Moments to Teach or Core Concepts and Products
    • New added resources each week!
  • Second Step Social-Emotional Learning Curriculum – Link
    • Free social-emotional learning resources for mental health professionals, educators, and parents to support skill-building for themselves and/or students 

Coping – Parent and Staff Guides

  • Large-Scale Natural Disasters: Helping Children Cope – Link
    • Handout – How to support children
  • Parent/Caregiver Guide to Helping Families Cope with the Coronavirus Disease 2019
  • Age-Related Reactions to a Traumatic EventLink
  • Supporting Children During Coronavirus (COVID19) – Link
  • Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Community Organizations and LeadersLink
  • Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Youth High School and College AgeLink
  • Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Parents – Link
  • Pandemic Flu Fact Sheet: A Parents’ Guide to Helping Families Cope with a Pandemic Flu
  • Helping Children Cope with Changes Resulting from COVID-19
  • Anxiety: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Depression: Helping Handout for Home – Link
  • Sleep Problems: Helping Handout for Home – Link
  • Addressing Grief – Link
    • Brief Facts and Tips, and Related Resources
  • Grief: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link

Healing After Disasters

  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping Adolescents after Disasters – Link
  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers after Disasters – Link
  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping Preschool-Age Children after Disasters – Link
  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping School-Age Children after Disasters – Link
  • After a Crisis: Helping Young Children Heal – Link

Educational Activities and Supports

Lessons/ Activities

  • My 2020 COVID-19 Time CapsuleLink
    • Printable activity book for kids!
  • Simple Activities for Children and Adolescents – Link
  • Seesaw – Remote Learning – Link
    • Trainings/PD and Resources
  • BrainPOP – Remote LearningLink
    • Lessons and Activities for various subjects
  • Epic! – Remote Learning Link
    • Parent and educator access
    • Books, learning videos, quizzes and more

Teaching Students about Coronavirus – Videos and Fact Sheets

  • Coronavirus Outbreak: How to protect yourself – Kids Learning Cartoon – Dr. Panda Tototime – Link
  • What is Coronavirus? Coronavirus Outbreak  – The Dr. Binocs Show – Peekaboo Kidz – Link
  • Talking to Children About Coronavirus: A Parent Resource
    • English
    • Spanish
    • Amharic, Chinese, Korean, French, Vietnamese, Bahasa, and Udu available on:

Parent/Guardian Distance Learning Supports

  • Parent Guide – Creating a Home Learning Environment (Handout) – Link
  • Daily Schedule (Blank, Printable)Link
  • Engagement and Motivation: Helping Handout for Home – Link
  • Using Praise and Rewards Wisely: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link

Self-Care for Adults

  • Free Guide to Living with Worry and Anxiety Amidst Global Uncertainty – Psychology Tools (Adults) – Link
    • Offered in many languages!
  • Self-Care: Dangers of “motivational” pressure – Link
  • Staff ResourcesLink
    • Self-Care Strategies, Meditation and Mindfulness, Free Exercise Opportunities, Arts and Entertainment, and Free Educational Opportunities!
  • Teacher Survival Tips – Dealing with Physical Distancing (Short Handout)Link
  • Care For Your Coronavirus Anxiety ToolkitLink
    • Online toolkit/website with information and activities (e.g., meditations) to address anxiety
  • That Discomfort You’re Feeling is Grief  – Harvard Business Review Article Link
  • Teacher NewsletterLink
    • Tips for Managing Stress and Anxiety (for you, students, or parents)
    • Talking about COVID-19 With Students
    • Examples of Child-Friendly Language You Can Use about COVID-19
  • FACE COVID – How to respond effectively to the Corona crisis (e-book) – Link
  • Wellness: 6 tips for taking care of yourself during this stressful time – Link
  • Taking Care of Yourself – Link
  • Coping with the COVID-19 Crisis: The Importance of Care for Caregivers – Tips for Administrators and Crisis Teams – Link
  • Care for Caregivers: Tips for Families and Educators – Link
  • Support for Teachers Affected by Trauma (STAT) Training Program Link
    • Geared toward pre-k through 12th grade teachers
    • Five online modules that explore the concepts of secondary trauma, risk factors associated with susceptibility to STS, the impact of STS across multiple life domains, and tangible self-care skills.
    • Self-paced training 

Distance Learning Supports (Teachers/Staff)

  • Learning and Teaching Online and From HomeLink
    • Expert advice, tips, and resources from Connections Academy online school educators
  • Using Praise and Rewards Wisely: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Anxiety: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Grief: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Seesaw – Remote Learning – Link
    • Trainings/PD and Resources
  • BrainPOP – Remote LearningLink
    • Lessons and Activities for various subjects

Addressing Harassment and Bullying

  • US Department of EducationLink
    • Letter and resources to address stereotyping, harassment and bullying
  • Countering Coronavirus Stigma and Racism: Tips for Teacher and Other Educators – Link
  • Countering Coronavirus Stigma and Racism: Tips for Parent and Caregivers

Crisis Supports

Suicide

  • Comprehensive School Suicide Prevention in a Time of Distance Learning – Link
  • Preventing Youth Suicide: Tips for Parents and Educators
  • Suicidal Thinking and Threats: Helping Handout for Home – Link

Emergency Management and Response

  • Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS)Link
    • Guidance, resources, tools, and training 
  • The PREPaRE Model, Crisis Intervention, and Global Pandemic –

Source

Source found on FaceBook: Copy of Family and Educator Resources for COVID-19 (PDF)

Movement Breaks in the Classroom

yoga201

Movement breaks are brief intervals that enable all students to move their bodies and help teachers to engage learners in physical ways. Chants, poems, even Morning Meeting greetings, and activities can be used as movement breaks throughout the day.

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Activities

  1. 5-4-3-2-1 In this simple game, students stand up and the teacher (or leader) has them do five different movements in descending order. For example the teacher would say: “Do five jumping jacks, spin around four times, hop on one foot three times, walk all the way around the classroom two times, give your neighbor one high-five (pausing in between each task for students to do it).
  2. Trading Places Have students stand behind their pushed-in chairs. Call out a trait, and everyone who has that trait must change places with someone else (students who do not have the trait stay where they are). Examples: “Everyone with curly hair.” “Everyone who ate cereal for breakfast.” “Everyone who is wearing stripes.”
  3. Six Spots Number six spots around your room from 1-6. Have students each go to a spot of their choice. Choose a student to roll a die (if you can make a big one out of foam, it adds to the fun). All the students at the number rolled must go back to their seats. Students that are left go to a new spot, and the die is rolled again. Continue until only a few students are left.
  4. Mingle, Mingle, Group! In this game students mill about the classroom saying, “mingle, mingle, mingle” in soft voices until the teacher says, “Groups of 5,” at which point the students must quickly group themselves into groups with the correct number of people. Students who are left over must do three jumping jacks before the next round starts. The teacher can call out any number for the group size. You can also add rules such as: as soon as a group is complete, all members must sit down in a line.
  5. Dance Party! Put on some rockin’ music and dance! If you can make the room semi-dark and have a black light or other special effect, your kids will love it!
  6. Freeze Dance! Similar to Dance Party, except that every so often the music stops, and students must freeze and hold the position they are in until the music begins again.
  7. Name Moves Students stand behind their chairs. In turn, each student says his or her name accompanied by a special movement. For example a student might say, “Kayla!” while dramatically dropping to one knee and doing Jazz Hands. After the student does his or her move, the rest of the class says the student’s name in unison and imitates the move. Then it is the next student’s turn.
  8. Keep It Up Students must keep a beach ball from hitting the ground. Add two or three balls to make it even more fun.
  9. Simon Says An oldie but a goody!
  10. Movement Songs Sing a song with whole-body movements, such as, “Head, Shoulders, Knees, and Toes,” “Father Abraham,” “Toe-Knee Chest-Nut,” “Shake Your Sillies Out (Raffie),” “Grand Old Duke of York,” “My Bonnie Lies over the Ocean,” etc.
  11. Recorded Movement Songs Older students might enjoy a simple Zumba routine, YMCA, or the Macarena. Littler ones will love Sesame Street’s A Very Simple Dance to Do.
  12. Animal Pretend Younger children will enjoy pretending to be various animals (or even objects such as lawn mowers or airplanes). Call out a few in sequence.
  13. Would You Rather Ask a “would you rather” question and have students show their choice by moving to one end of the room or the other. Have a few kids share why. Here are 20 free “Would You Rather” Questions to get you started.
  14. Find It Fast Call out a color or other trait (e.g. something round, something made of wood), and students must find an object in the room that fits the trait and get to it quickly.
  15. Physical Challenges Challenge students to do something physically difficult, such as standing on one foot with arms extended, or this one: Grab your nose with left hand, and grab your left earlobe with your right hand, and then quickly switch so that your right hand is on your nose and your left hand is grabbing your right earlobe. Yoga poses could also be a good variation.
  16. Plates Give each student a paper plate. Students must walk around the room balancing the plates on their heads. If a student drops his or her plate, the student must freeze until another student picks it up and places it back on the student’s head (while keeping his or her own plate in place, of course).
  17. Line Up! Have students line up using a specific criteria, such as age (use day and month, not just year), height, alphabetically by middle name, hair length, etc.
  18. Limbo All you need is a long stick and a pair of kids to hold it. Music is nice, too.
  19. Human Knot Divide students into groups of about eight students. Have students each grab right hands with someone who is not directly next to them. Then do the same with left hands. The challenge is to untangle and become a circle without releasing hands.
  20. Jump Skip Counting Have students count by twos, fives, tens etc. while jumping with each count. You could also practice spelling words this way.

Source

Videos from GoNoodle are great!

GoNoodle videos get kids moving to be their strongest, bravest, silliest, smartest, bestest selves. Over 14 million kids each month are dancing, stretching, running, jumping, deep breathing, and wiggling with GoNoodle.

For Teachers: 3 out of 4 elementary schools in the US use GoNoodle to: – Give students the brain breaks they need – Host indoor recess – Make subject transitions seamless – Energize or calm their class

Create a free account on GoNoodle.com now and find hundreds of ways to move! — https://goo.gl/fA6qK3

Videos from Stand Up Kids

BURPEE

HOLLOW ROCK

PUSH UP

LEARN TO SQUAT

FULL SQUAT

SQUAT DRILL

MAKE IT RAIN

CROCODILES & CRABS

SHAKE THE WIGGLES OUT

FAST FEET & HIGH JUMPS

BLOCKED SQUAT & GRASSHOPPERS

ONE LEGGED HOPS & PLANKS

AIR SQUAT & RUN IN PLACE

Pogo Jumps & Lunges

Pushups & Spins

Blocked Squats & Backpack Chair Deadlifts

Floppies & Planks

Push Press & Tuck Jumps

Articles

Teaching with the Brain in Mind, 2nd Edition by Eric Jensen  Chapter 4. Movement and Learning

Research-Tested Benefits of Breaks Students are easily distracted, but regular, short breaks can help them focus, increase their productivity, and reduce their stress

The Cognitive Benefits of Physical Activity in the Classroom

Movement Breaks to the Rescue!

Classroom-Based Movement Breaks

Sensory and Movement Break Ideas | Getting Classrooms Moving!

Teacher Toolbox Physical Activity Breaks in the Secondary Classroom

Middle School Activity Breaks

Movement Breaks OT Tips

ocean-movement-flash-cards

Tips

  • Keep physical activity breaks short and manageable. Shoot for 1 – 5 minute breaks at least 2-3 times per day.
  • Participate with your students in the activity. Students will be more likely to join in and have fun if they see their school community moving with them.
  • Ask teachers and school administrators to share and demonstrate their favorite activities, games, and movement ideas during staff meetings throughout the school year.
  • Create a classroom atmosphere that embraces movement! Consider playing age and culturally appropriate music. Be patient – it may take some time for kids to embrace and be comfortable with the physical activity.
  • Integrate physical activity into academic concepts when possible. For example, a social studies unit on the Olympics can include student participation in classroom energizers fitting into an Olympic theme.
  • Encourage your physical education teacher to be a movement leader and advocate. Ask if he or she can share some simple motor skills and games for classroom teachers and guidance for creating safe movement spaces.
  • Empower students by asking them to share their own physical activity break ideas. Provide opportunities for students to lead and demonstrate activities.
  • Add physical activity breaks right into your daily schedule. Try creating a classroom physical activity calendar of events that includes a variety of ideas throughout the month. Use a classroom physical activity tracker to help your students reach 10 minutes daily! Check out these brain break for testing ideas.
  • Add in fun equipment items such as beanbags, spot markers, yoga mats, and balance boards. Consider applying for a Game On grant!
  • Integrate health and fitness concepts while moving with students to emphasize the importance of daily physical activity and good nutrition.

Source

Books

 Energizers! 88 Quick Movement Activities That Refresh and Refocus– Susan Roser

Action-Packed Classrooms, K-5: Using Movement to Educate and Invigorate Learners (2009)

  • by Cathie Summerford (Link)
  • “Focusing on using movement and music to energize young students and boost their learning, this research-based book offers strategies for basic energizers, clear objectives for standards-aligned instruction, and a student/teacher/principal agreement to commit to active learning.” – Amazon

Brain Breaks for the Classroom: Quick and Easy Breathing and Movement Activities That Help Students Reenergize, Refocus, and Boost Brain Power-Anytime of the Day! (2009)

  • by Michelle Gay (Link)
  • “40 fun exercises help students take a quick break and return to their work refreshed and ready to learn. Each exercise is designed to get more oxygen and energy to students’ brains, improve their focus, and calm their nervous systems. The result: increased motivation, cooperation, and learning in the classroom. Includes a full-color poster with five easy moves all kids can do when they need a ‘brain break’! For use with Grades K–5.” – Amazon

Brain Gym: Teacher’s Edition (2010)

  • by Paul E. Dennison and Gail E. Dennison (Link)
  • “This is a stand-alone book for parents, teachers and learners who want in-depth descriptions and variations for the 26 Brain Gym activities.” – Amazon

Energizing Brain Breaks (2009)

  • by David U. Sladkey (Link)

Energizing Brain Breaks 2 (2011)

The Kinesthetic Classroom: Teaching and Learning Through Movement (2010)

  • by Traci Lengel and Mike Kuczala (Link)
  • “Research shows that regular physical activity helps children perform better in school. This inspiring book illustrates how to integrate movement within classroom instruction, ranging from short activity breaks to curriculum-enhancing games.” – Amazon

Learning on Your Feet: Incorporating Physical Activity into the K-8 Classroom (2016)

  • by Brad Johnson and Melody Jones (Link)
  • “In this much-needed book, you’ll learn how incorporating physical activity into the classroom can improve students’ engagement, achievement, and overall wellness. Students typically spend most of the day sitting at their desks, and many don’t have recess or PE, yet research shows that regular exercise helps stimulate brain function and improve skills such as reading, critical thinking, organization, and focus.” – Amazon

Moving INTO the Classroom (2018)

  • Stacia Miller and Suzanne Lindt, Eds (Link)
  • This textbook focuses on research in movement integration and the benefits of physical activity to the child’s physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development. It includes research on and suggestions for integrating movement into English-language arts, mathematics, science and social studies for lower and upper elementary students. Though the textbook is specifically aimed at elementary-level teachers, secondary teachers and pre-service teachers can modify the activities to fit their lessons as well. – Springer
Perceptual-Motor Activities for Children with Web Resource: An Evidence-Based Guide to Building Physical and Cognitive Skills (2011)
  • by Jill Johnstone and Molly Ramon (Link)
  • “…blueprint for improving perceptual-motor skills—the skills that require young learners to use their brains and their bodies together to accomplish tasks. When kids improve these skills, they not only improve their coordination and increase their body awareness but they also enhance their intellectual skills and gain a more positive self-image.” – Human Kinetics

Physical Activity and Educational Achievement: Insights from Exercise Neuroscience (2018)

  • edited by Romain Meeusen, Sabine Schaefer, Phillip Tomporowski, and Richard Bailey (Link)
  • “A growing body of research evidence suggests that physical activity can have a positive effect on educational achievement. This book examines a range of processes associated with physical activity that are of relevance to those working in education – including cognition, learning, memory, attention, mood, stress and mental health symptoms – and draws on the latest insights from exercise neuroscience to help explain the evidence.” – Amazon

Physical Activity and Health Promotion in the Early Years (2018)

  • edited by Hannah Brewer and Mary Renck Jalongo (Link)
  • “This book…provides a theoretical base explaining why physical activity is important, and offers practical strategies for increasing health and well-being in early childhood settings. It takes ancient wisdom on the mind and body connection, applies it to the youngest children, and supports it with current empirical and international evidence—all with an eye toward improving wellness across the lifespan. The many topics discussed in the book include children’s motor skills, movement, interaction, physical literacy, the use of video games, dog ownership, developmental delays, as well as strategies to improve physical activities in the classroom and broader contexts.”

Spark: the Revolutionary New Science of Exercise and the Brain (2008)

  • by John J. Ratey (Link)
  • “Did you know you can beat stress, lift your mood, fight memory loss, sharpen your intellect, and function better than ever simply by elevating your heart rate and breaking a sweat? The evidence is incontrovertible: aerobic exercise physically remodels our brains for peak performance.” – Amazon

Teaching with the Brain in Mind (2005)  – chap. 9: Movement and Learning

  • by Eric Jensen (Link)
  • “…[this] best-seller is loaded with ideas for how to improve student achievement and create a more effective classroom by applying brain research to your teaching. [It] translates the latest scientific findings into effective instructional strategies…” – Amazon

The Third Teacher: 79 Ways You Can Use Design to Transform Teaching and Learning (2010)

  • by OWP/P Architects, VS Furniture, & Bruce Mau Design (Link)
  • “Created by an international team of architects and designers concerned about our failing education system, [this book] explores the critical link between the school environment and how children learn…” – Amazon

healthyhabits

 

Joel Shaul’s Autism Spectrum Resources

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Recently, I ran across a treasure trove of resources from  http://autismteachingstrategies.com/. It was designed and published by Joel Shaul.  In this blog post I will provide links to his content.

Joel Shaul specializes in mental health services for children and teens at the autism spectrum.

In his work with children on the autism spectrum in various settings, Joel has noticed a need for more engaging social skills curricula, stronger visual components and more compelling social skills learning activities.  He first created the World of Ryuu with Rebecca Klaw, another Pittsburgh-based professional working with children with Asperger’s or other autism spectrum disorders.  His  two illustrated children’s books, The Conversation Train and The Green Zone Conversation Book, are published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers.  Joel provides dozens of free social skills downloads on this website.

Through Autism Teaching Strategies, Joel provides trainings nationwide on the topics of social skills teaching and effective counseling for children with high functioning autism.

Joel provides individual and group services, in schools and clinical settings, at The Watson Institute in Sewickley, Pa.

He received a master’s degree in social work from the University of Louisville in 1986 and a bachelor’s degree in psychology from the University of Michigan in 1979.  Joel was a community organizer with the Peace Corps in Sierra Leone where he helped to build a midwife clinic and develop a health education curriculum for primary schools.

Source

Videos

Upset Feelings Video for Kids: CBT Video One

Upset Feelings Video for Kids: CBT Video Two

Upset Feelings Video for Kids: CBT Video Three

Upset Feelings Video for Kids: CBT Video Four

Upset Feelings Video for Kids: CBT Video Five

Upset Feelings Video for Kids:  CBT Video Six

Upset Feeling Video for Kids: CBT Video Seven

Upset Feelings Video for Kids: CBT Video Eight

Materials and Strategies

CBT Thought Bubbles: How to Download and Use Them

Simple CBT Worksheets: How to Download and Use Them

Brief descriptions of the free download resources on social communication

Brief descriptions of the free download resources on emotional regulation

Brief descriptions of the free download resources combining relationships/emotions/communication

Using visual word prompts and a song to teach showing interest to kids with ASD

Using picture prompts for non-verbal communication for children with ASD

Using chain and girder pictures to teach conversation skills to kids with ASD

Using a balance to teach relationship reciprocity to children with ASD

Using a balance to teach conversation reciprocity to children with ASD

Using a flip camera for social skills training for kids with ASD

How to make social-skills training game-like and fun for children with ASD

Social-skills training technique for ASD, using tokens

Hello songs to reinforce greetings for kids with ASD

Goodbye song for teaching goodbye to kids with ASD

Social-skills song to promote eye contact for kids with ASD

Social Skills

FREE SOCIAL SKILLS DOWNLOADS

Card Game

The World of Ryuu*

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Using a fantasy world of dragons to build social skills in humans.
Ryuu products are a collection of teaching and therapy aids based on a fantasy world of dragons. Ryuu  activities teach social and emotional skills to children and teens with autism, Asperger Syndrome, and other autism spectrum disorders. These products are designed to teach social, emotional and communication skills by combining fantasy worlds, card collecting, and role play.

*Sold at www.ryuuworld.com.

Influencing Student Self Concept

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Many times in my work as a School Psychologist I see students who are capable of doing the work, but their self-concept as not being a learner gets in the way of success.

Four ideas for teachers to help start students thinking of themselves as competent learners.

  1. Start with what they are doing well at academically. (Be specific and authentic)
  2. Ask the student what might be missing from your instruction that they need to be more successful.
  3. When a student has responded to corrective feedback, praise the student with specifics on how they helped to transform their learning and you are excited to keep watching them grow as a learner.
  4. Connect and talk to your grade level team and also support staff (Principal, Counselor, and School Psychologist) to get more ideas and tools to support your student in need.

Articles

Self-Concept and Self-Esteem in Adolescents (NASP)

Understanding and Fostering Achievement Motivation (NASP)

Student Self Esteem and the School System: Perceptions and Implications

Dr. Ken Shore’s Classroom Problem Solver -The Student With Low Self-Esteem

Self-concept and School Performance – UCLA

SELF-BELIEFS AND SCHOOL SUCCESS: SELF-EFFICACY, SELF-CONCEPT, AND SCHOOL ACHIEVEMENT

Ideas to support students

Characteristic How to support
Sense of security
  • Maintain a safe and healthy learning environment by following safety policies and procedures.
  • Show all children you care about their well-being by talking to them each day and learning about their lives.
  • Be consistent and follow through on your promises.
Sense of belonging
  • Create a community atmosphere.
  • Celebrate all children as individuals.
  • Implement a zero-tolerance policy on bullying, and promote kindness and character education.
Sense of purpose, responsibility and contribution
  • Give children responsibilities in the environment.
  • Ask for input from children when creating activity plans and setting themes.
Sense of personal competence and pride
  • Give children opportunities for success.
  • Have activities that are varied in levels of difficulty so that children can be challenged in a safe way.
Sense of trust
  • Gain the trust of children by creating an atmosphere based on respect and kindness.
  • Set boundaries that give children opportunities for safe risk taking.
  • Be consistent and follow through on your promises.
Sense of making real choices and decisions
  • Give children the opportunity to choose their activities, field trips, etc. Make them feel like their input and voice matters by taking their suggestions seriously and using them to develop activity plans.
Sense of self-discipline and self-control
  • Use positive guidance methods that support school-age children and their ability to regulate their own behavior.
  • Help children gain self-control by teaching them coping techniques.
Sense of encouragement, support and reward
  • Provide guidance, encouragement, feedback and praise when children are working hard towards any goal (big or small).
Sense of accepting mistakes and failures
  • Turn mistakes, setbacks or failures into learning opportunities by talking to children about what happened. Discuss with them the choices, steps or decisions that could have changed the outcome.
  • Always talk about how a child would do something differently in the future. This helps them to apply their current situation to future events.
Sense of family self-esteem
  • Families are a child’s first and most important caregiver, teacher and advocate. Children need to feel comfortable, loved and safe within their family unit.
  • Work with families to support their needs.

Source: American Academy of Pediatrics (2015). Caring for Your School-Age Child: Ages 5 to 12. Available at:https://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/Pages/Helping-Your-Child-Develop-A-Healthy-Sense-of-Self-Esteem.aspx

Source:  https://www.virtuallabschool.org/school-age/self-culture/lesson-2

Course work

Complete Lesson on Building self-concept of school aged children

Video

Caregivers give their own examples on how to promote positive self-concept in children Video

Quick Measure

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Anger management tools

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Anger – Article

“Anger is the deepest form of compassion,” poet and philosopher David Whyte wrote in reclaiming the unseen dimensions of everyday words. “The internal living flame of anger always illuminates what we belong to, what we wish to protect and what we are willing to hazard ourselves for.” Anyone who has ever flared with anger at a loved one has brushed with this strange dissonance and knows it to be true on a most primal level. And yet we continue to judge — and especially to self-judge — only one side of anger, its destructive face, neglecting its paradoxical but profound constructive function as a mobilizing agent for our values. Source

Grades K-5

Counseling Blog with a lot of coping strategies for anger                        

(Click this site it has awesome resources)

Zones of Regulation is a Great system to integrate into your classroom. (Paid for Materials) (Free share materials) (Tablet APP)

Therapy worksheets related to Anger for Children

Visuals for the classroom(K-1)  Solution KIT

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Tucker Turtle Takes Time to Tuck and Think Slide Show , PPT

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Angry Bird Lessons

Angry Bird Posters

Angry Bird Student Book

Grades 6-12

PSYCHOLOGY TOOLS COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (CBT) WORKSHEETS FOR ANGER MANAGEMENT

Therapy worksheets related to Anger

Anger Worksheets

ANGER MANAGEMENT WORKBOOK

Anger Mapping- UNDERSTANDING AND REDUCING ANGRY FEELINGS

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Scaling is a good strategy to help with perspective taking.

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Special Education – Starting the School Year

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We are almost back at another school  year. Time to suit up and get the show on the road. Of course coming back to the classroom carries the gamut of feelings and expression of those emotions. So with that in mind here is a short list of readings and ideas, I have come across over the summer with my own return.

Mindset

Nuts and Bolts

Tools

Parents

Ice Breaker Video

 

Behavioral practice

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Every kid has a point in time when they need either their parents and/ or teachers to support them with learning new behavioral skills.

Practical Practice Ideas for developing a variety of social emotional skills.

Taking Turns and Being Patient

Please take a moment and practice these skills at school and at home by:

  • Playing a Game
  • Reminding me to wait my turn
  • Asking me what
  •  I can do while I wait for my turn

 

Having rules and Following rules

Please take a moment and practice these skills at school and at home by:

  • Asking your student why rules are important
  • By playing a game with rules
  • By creating new rules

 

Feelings and Emotions

Please take a moment and practice these skills at school and at home by:

  • Asking your student to name as many feelings as they can
  • Encourage your student to verbally name their feelings
  • Verbally expressing your feelings as the parent/teacher
  • Asking your student to identify the feelings of others in a story or on television
  • Have your student show you what different emotions look like

 

Using “I” statements

Please take a moment and practice this skill at school and at home by:

  • Having you student use “I” statements throughout the week (e.g. “I feel…”, “I want…”, “I think…”)
  • Ask student why it is important to use “I” statements
  • Ask student in what setting they should use “I” statements

 

Anger

Please take a moment and practice recognizing Anger at school and at home by:

  • Asking what your students body look like when they are Angry.
  • Ask your student to explain the Grouchometer
  • Ask your student where they are on the Grouchometer throughout the week

 

Words and there meanings

Please take a moment and practice these skills at school and at home by:

  • Asking your student what kind of messages words send.
  • Ask your student to give examples of “Nice” words
  • Ask student why people may say “Not Nice” words

 

Anger

  • Asking what your students what they should do when angry
  • Ask your student to explain things that may be triggers for Anger
  • Ask your student what they can say if they are Angry
  • Practice “Stop and Think” to calm down

 

Teasing

  • Ask your student, “What does teasing look like?”
  • Ask your student what are their options for dealing with teasing (ignore, agree, tell adult, ask, “Why did you say that?” Say, “I want you to stop”).
  • Role-play situations and ask your student what they would say or do in these situations.

 

Consequences

  • Recognizing that there may be both positive and negative consequences.
  • Have your student list positive and negative consequences throughout the week.
  • Role-play scenarios and have your student state appropriate consequences.
  • Play a board game that has consequences

 

Problem-Solving

  • Role-play disagreements and ask “what does each person need?”
  • Have students consider consequences
  • Have your student make the best choice or make a plan to help with problem solving.
  • Reflect on whether or not the plan worked

Other Resources:

Vanderbilt CSEFEL- Practical Strategies for Teachers/Caregivers

“You Got It!” Teaching Social and Emotional Skills

Fostering Social and Emotional Skills Development in Early Childhood – PPT

Resilience Booster: Parent Tip Tool – APA resource

 

Selective Mutism

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What is Selective Mutism

Selective Mutism is a complex childhood anxiety disorder characterized by a child’s inability to speak and communicate effectively in select social settings, such as school. These children are able to speak and communicate in settings where they are comfortable, secure, and relaxed.

 

For Teachers

Understanding Selective Mutism A Guide to Helping Our Teachers Understand

SELECTIVE MUTISM: RECOMMENDATIONS FOR TEACHERS

Tips for Helping Kids With Selective Mutism Go Back to School

For School Psychologists

Selective Mutism DSM-5 312.23 (F94.0)

Silent Suffering: Children with Selective Mutism

Tool Kit- Supporting Children with Selective Mutism Practice Guidelines

CASP Article-Selective Mutism: A Three-Tiered Approach to Prevention and Intervention

PREZI- Selective Mutism

School Evaluation Form

For Speech Pathologists

Selective Mutism – Speech-LanguagePathologist

A Socio-Communication Intervention Model for Selective Mutism

Speech-Language Therapy and Selective Mutism

Selective Mutism: Assessment and Intervention

Good PPT

School Speech Questionnaire and other supportive tools

Great Blog Post on Treatment of Selective Mutism with Tools!!!

Resources for Selective Mutism:

source

Book- The Silence Within: A Teacher/Parent Guide to Working with Selectively Mute and Shy Children. by, Gail Goetze Karvatt

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0615121519?tag=pediastaff0d-20&camp=213381&creative=390973&linkCode=as4&creativeASIN=0615121519&adid=0V5WF1JFZHYN95DPRADE

Wikipedia – Selective Mutism http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Selective_mutism

The organizations which have information on selective mutism:

K12 Academics

NYU Child Study Center

Selective Mutism Foundation

Selective Mutism and Childhood AnxietyDisorders Group

Child Mind Institute

http://www.childmind.org/en/clinics/programs/selective-mutism-program

http://www.childmind.org/en/nightline-selective-mutism/ 

Selective Mutism on Line http://selectivemutismonline.com