Anger management tools

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Anger – Article

“Anger is the deepest form of compassion,” poet and philosopher David Whyte wrote in reclaiming the unseen dimensions of everyday words. “The internal living flame of anger always illuminates what we belong to, what we wish to protect and what we are willing to hazard ourselves for.” Anyone who has ever flared with anger at a loved one has brushed with this strange dissonance and knows it to be true on a most primal level. And yet we continue to judge — and especially to self-judge — only one side of anger, its destructive face, neglecting its paradoxical but profound constructive function as a mobilizing agent for our values. Source

Grades K-5

Counseling Blog with a lot of coping strategies for anger                        

(Click this site it has awesome resources)

Zones of Regulation is a Great system to integrate into your classroom. (Paid for Materials) (Free share materials) (Tablet APP)

Therapy worksheets related to Anger for Children

Visuals for the classroom(K-1)  Solution KIT

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Tucker Turtle Takes Time to Tuck and Think Slide Show , PPT

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Angry Bird Lessons

Angry Bird Posters

Angry Bird Student Book

Grades 6-12

PSYCHOLOGY TOOLS COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (CBT) WORKSHEETS FOR ANGER MANAGEMENT

Therapy worksheets related to Anger

Anger Worksheets

ANGER MANAGEMENT WORKBOOK

Anger Mapping- UNDERSTANDING AND REDUCING ANGRY FEELINGS

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Scaling is a good strategy to help with perspective taking.

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Special Education – Starting the School Year

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We are almost back at another school  year. Time to suit up and get the show on the road. Of course coming back to the classroom carries the gamut of feelings and expression of those emotions. So with that in mind here is a short list of readings and ideas, I have come across over the summer with my own return.

Mindset

Nuts and Bolts

Tools

Parents

Ice Breaker Video

 

Home School Communication

Parents teacher meeting

Home school communication a great tool in working with challenging behavior. Parents often hold the keys to change.

Here are some examples:

Look at examples on pages 35-37

Principles and examples of home school communication from PENT: here

More examples of blank templates: here and here

Articles:

11 Rules for Better Parent-Teacher Teamwork

Sharing Data to Create Stronger Parent Partnerships

Visually readable progress reports

Simple:

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Source

To more involved:

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Daily Behavior Report Cards (DBRC)

Ongoing communication between home and school is an important component to behavior plans. DBRCs can be a very easy, efficient and helpful way of motivating students as well as informally monitoring behavioral improvement with intervention. Teacher behavior report cards can be designed to accomplish the following:

  •  Point out to the students behaviors that they need to learn (skill deficit).
  •  Provide a schedule of teacher attention/feedback for positive behaviors.
  •  Motivate students through reinforcing positive behavior that teachers want to increase, and providing consequences (e.g., a sad face) for negative behaviors they want to decrease.
  •  Increase home-school communication (increase accountability with additional opportunities for positive or negative consequences for behavior).
  •  Evaluate whether the intervention is working or not when used with other measures.

Source

Top Five Reasons to Engage Parents

1. Decades of research show when parents are involved students have:

  • – Higher grades, test scores, and graduation rates
  • – Better school attendance – Increased motivation, better self-esteem
  • – Lower rates of suspension
  • – Decreased use of drugs and alcohol
  • – Fewer instances of violent behavior

National Parent Teacher Association

2. Family participation in education is twice as predictive of students’ academic success as family socioeconomic status. Some of the more intensive programs had effects that were 10 times greater than other factors. Walberg (1984) in his review of 29 studies of school–parent programs.

3. School Benefits:

  • – Improves teacher morale
  • – Higher ratings of teachers by parents
  • – More support from families
  • – Higher student achievement
  • – Better reputations in the community

A New Generation of Evidence: The Family is Critical to Student Achievement, edited by Anne T. Henderson and Nancy Berla, Center for Law and Education, Washington, D.C., 1994 (third printing, 1996)

4. Parent involvement leads to feelings of ownership, resulting in increased support of schools. Davies, Don. (1988). Low Income Parents and the Schools: A Research Report and a Plan for Action. Equity and Choice 4,3 (Spring): 51-57. EJ 374 512.

5. Parents express a genuine and deep-seated desire to help their children succeed academically, regardless of differences in socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, and cultural background. Mapp (1999)

Source

 

 

I am giving a brief talk tonight!

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COMMUNITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE &
SPECIAL PARENTS INFORMATION NETWORK(CAC & SPIN)

JOIN US AND SHARE YOUR IDEAS!

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2016 FROM 6:30PM TO 8:00PM

PVUSD DISTRICT- BOARD ROOM
294 GREEN VALLEY ROAD, WATSONVILLE
REFRESHMENTS WILL BE PROVIDED

Meeting Topics

 Addressing Social and Learning Needs Through Utilizing Web-Based
Resources, Presented by Corey Tamblyn
Blog: https://buildingmomentuminschools.wordpress.com
 The Importance of Movement- Adaptive Movement from the
Adaptive Yoga Project, Presented by Annica Rose

The CAC is composed of parents of individuals with disabilities enrolled in public or
private schools, parents of nondisabled students, students and adults with
disabilities, general education teachers, special education teachers and other school
personnel, representatives of other public and private agencies, and persons
concerned with the needs of individuals with disabilities.

Taking Care of the Caretaker

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A few months ago I wrote a post called, “Check your Stress!” While it had some good tools to identify whether or not you were stressed, getting to the mindset of self care is something I have observed many parents and teachers avoid even if they realize it is affecting their work and happiness. Here are a few resources out there.

Get informed

Seven Types of Self-Care Activities for Coping with Stress

Self Care Advice for Caring Professionals

The Internet Wants to Help You Take Care of Yourself Stop. Are you hungry? Then eat something before reading this.

Self-Care For Teachers by Anne Brunette, MSW, Family Therapist

How Self-Compassion Can Help Prevent Teacher Burnout

Stess Warning Signs and Symptoms

Write about it

Simple approach
Think about ways of behaving, feeling or thinking that you would like to: • stop • start • continue.
For example: I would like to stop feeling guilty that I am not doing more for my ill family member. I would like to start taking an afternoon time out just for myself, to go shopping or to do yoga or to visit with friends. I would like to continue going to a family self-help group such as the Mood Disorders Association of Ontario when this support group ends.
_________________________________________________________
Write down your wishes.
Stop: ____________________________________________________________
Start: ____________________________________________________________
Continue: ____________________________________________________________

Activity : Quick wins

Get Help

Get a Therapist.  In the US or Canada this link will find a therapist for you.

Some measures of Stress and Burn out

PROFESSIONAL QUALITY OF LIFE SCALE (PROQOL)

ARE YOU BURNING OUT?

Putting Things Into Perspective Where is your time going?

Tself-care assessment scale by Saakvitne and Pearlman from the Traumatic Stress Institute.

Ted Talk Videos

Self Care

Other Links

Self-Care for Teachers

The following resources can help you cope with some of the common sources of stress and burnout among educators and others in the helping professions.

Self-Care Review – Checklist

Student SELF-CARE Manual (Good tools)

Self-Care Domains In each domain, list the activities you are doing to take care of yourself.

My Self Care Plan

Workbook with Self Care tools

Self Care Strategies

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Parenting Balanced Kids

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Last night I attended the talk by Dr. Denise Pope at Cabrillo College. She recently wrote a book called – Overloaded and Underprepared: Strategies for Stronger Schools, and Healthy Successful Kids. For the past thirteen years, she has specialized in student engagement, curriculum studies, qualitative research methods, and service learning. She lectures nationally on parenting techniques and pedagogical strategies to increase student health, engagement with learning, and integrity. Her book Doing School: How We are Creating a Generation of Stressed Out, Materialistic, and Miseducated Students was awarded Notable Book in Education by the American School Board Journal.

 

Denise is a three-time recipient of the Stanford University Graduate School of Education Outstanding Teacher and Mentor Award. She has been featured on CNN, World News Tonight, the Today Show, NPR, among other television and radio programs. Source

She had a great message and I could not stop thinking about how applicable it was to our kids. She of course has written books (which I plan to read) and is published professionally, but what I found remarkable was the amount of resources on her website.

Here are a few:

Videos
Research based fact sheets
Publications
Websites
Crisis Information

 

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Dr. Wendy Mogel is another champion of today’s children.

Tip Sheet

ANONYMOUS A 26 step program for good parents gone bad

Really fun video!

 

 

Movie on the topic