Special Needs Surfing in Santa Cruz

raw_tandem_surfing

Ran into a parent who was raving about this surfing/ ocean experience for special needs kiddos. I was thinking that we should pass it on to whoever we come across that would like a fun-filled day at the beach.


http://rideawave.org/

Ride a Wave’s mission is to give children with special needs the chance to feel the thrill of riding a wave and experience a safe, fun-filled day at the beach, whether they are physically, developmentally, or economically challenged.
Since its inception in 1998, Ride a Wave (RAW) has helped over 2,500 kids get in the water and have a life-changing day at the beach with activities including:

A lifeguard demonstration and marine safety orientation
Stretching and sunscreen
Beach obstacle course
Boogie Boarding
Kayaking
Tandem Surfing
Snacks, water, and a hot lunch
Awards ceremony
[Some Ride a Wave Activities]
All at no cost to any child, organization or individual.

Source

News Report

Disabled children learn to surf in Santa Cruz More than 35 kids received free surf lessons at Cowell Beach in Santa Cruz with the nonprofit Ride A Wave.

Movie

Ride a Wave Documentary Facebook page

5d055ddec4916a8c5232bce2a7caa433_original

Advertisements

Lack of Student Motivation

motivation

Motivating all students can be a challenge. This post focuses on the issues and strategies to help support those pupils who need us as teachers to meet them where they are at and help them find their way to motivation.

Reading

Motivating Learning in Young Children- NASP

Motivation Matters: 40% Of High School Students Chronically Disengaged From School

The Motivation Equation: Understanding a Child’s Lack of Effort by Kenneth Barish, Ph.D.

Student Motivation, Engagement, and Achievement

Motivating Students to Learn By: Heather Voke

Classroom Applications of Cognitive Theories of Motivation By: Nona Tollefson

Motivation: The Key to Academic Success By: LD OnLine

How can parents help

Parents are central to student motivation. The beginning of a new school year is very important. Children with LD and ADHD often struggle with change. Parents can help get the year off to a good start.

  1. Provide a warm, accepting home environment.
  2. Give clear directions and feedback.
  3. Create a model for success
  4. Build on the student’s strengths
  5. Relate schoolwork to the student’s interests
  6. Help build a family structure that fosters consistent work towards the goal.
  7. Help the student to have some control over how and when he learns.
  8. Emphasize the child’s progress rather than his or her performance in comparison to the other students in the class or family.
  9. Remember to reinforce the behavior you want.
  10. Use reinforcers wisely. Recall that intrinsic motivation works best. Follow a child’s interests, when possible, rather than spending time building elaborate reward systems Source

Strategies

Students lack interest or motivation – Strategies

Using Motivational Interviewing to Help Your Students by Lisa A. Sheldon

Motivation — Helping Your Child Through Early Adolescence – U.S. Department of Education

Motivating Your Students

21 Simple Ideas To Improve Student Motivation

Enhancing Students’ Motivation By Annick M. Brennen

The Student Lacks Confidence that He or She Can Do the Work

What the Research Says: Students who believe that they have the ability to complete a particular academic task (self-efficacy) do better and have higher levels of motivation (Jacobs et al., 2002). Yet students often sabotage their academic performance by engaging in negative self-talk about their abilities and by making faulty attributions to explain poor academic performance (Linnenbrink & Pintrich, 2002). Source

Presentation Six Reasons Why Students Are Unmotivated (and What Teachers Can Do) Jim Wright

Reasons for Lack of Motivation
  Stipek
Why Students Are Not Motivated to Learn
Sternberg
Why Intelligent People Fail
Cognitive-Oriented
Reasons
  • Present activities not seen as related to important goals.
  • Do not have (or believe one does not have) the ability to do present activities or obtain future goals.
  • Distractibility and lack of concentration
  • Spreading oneself too thin or too thick
  • Inability or unwillingness to see the forest for the trees
  • Lack of balance between critical, analytic thinking and creative, synthetic thinking
  • Using the wrong abilities
Affective/Socially-
Oriented Reasons
  • Feelings/emotions about present activities are generally negative.
  • Satisfaction of achieving goals seems in distant future.
  • Personal problems interfere with present activities.
  • Misattribution of blame
  • Fear of failure
  • Excessive self-pity
  • Excessive dependency
  • Wallowing in personal difficulties
  • Too little or too much self-confidence
Conative/Volitionally-
Oriented Reasons
  • Do not have a written list of important goals that define success personally.
  • Believe that present goals or activities are wrong for individual.
  • Important goals conflict with present activities.
  • Failure to initiate
  • Lack of motivation
  • Lack of perservance and perseveration
  • Inability to complete tasks and to follow through
  • Lack of impulse control
  • Inability to translate thought into action
  • Procrastination
  • Lack of product orientation
  • Inability to delay gratification
Environmentally-Oriented Reasons
  • Extrinsic incentives are low.
 

Source

 

References

  • Sternberg, R. (1994). In search of the human mind (395-396). New York: Harcourt Brace.
  • Stipek, D. (1988). Motivation to learn: From theory to practice. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.

Motivational Interview

“Motivational Interviewing is a collaborative, goal-oriented style of communication with particular attention to the language of change. It is designed to strengthen personal motivation for and commitment to a specific goal by eliciting and exploring the person’s own reasons for change within an atmosphere of acceptance and compassion.” Miller and Rollnick (2012)

“When we think of failure; Failure will be ours.  If we remain undecided; Nothing will ever change.  All we need to do is want to achieve something great and then simply do it.  Never think of failure, for what we think, will come about.”    ~Maharishi Mahesh Yogi

MI Guide

3a11547d7927a2fa460e1fd130e00cb2

Motivational Interviewing Strategies and Techniques: Rationales and Examples

20x1

75bdc4cf0d9765ddf9df3595f96515f7

b631060395e9f26786a706a5fb4614f6

 

Loose Things and Play

d91eeecb01866513988fd0969251ee13

I have always noticed when my kids have a novel nondescript object (stick, box)  to play with it tends to capture  their imaginative states for longer periods of time. Living by the beach both my kids seem to find driftwood, shells, sticks and existing sand castle, holes, and sand mounds to play in and around for hours on end. This is what perked my interest in the idea of what I would later find to be labeled as the “Theory of loose parts”.

Read this Article First- the-theory-of-loose-parts

Then this more serious article by Ruth Wilson, Ph.D.

Why Children Play Under the Bushes

The theory of “loose parts” first proposed by architect Simon Nicholson in the 1970’s has begun to influence child-play experts and the people who design playspaces for children in a big way. Nicholson believed that it is the ‘loose parts’ in our environment that will empower our creativity.

loose-parts

Blogs reviewing the power and scope of Loose Parts.

THE THEORY OF LOOSE PARTS

Loose Parts Outside for Adventurous Play!

10 Reasons to Love Loose Parts

Loose parts storage for playgrounds

theory of loose parts

THE THEORY OF LOOSE PARTS: THE RIGHT TO BE CREATIVE

 

homemade-playdough-recipe-and-play

Resource materials/ readings

loose-parts-manualloose-parts-by-schemaloose-parts-manual

loose-parts-by-schema

Book- Loose Parts: Inspiring Play in Young Children

Article- Children’s Outdoor Play & Learning Environments: Returning to Nature

7b1261ffe8c268533d10f8b84a38c718

 

Hope of a better tomorrow

At least monthly I see or hear and/ or work with people who experience tremendous tragedy and strife. It can bog me down. Teachers often ask, “How do you deal with suffering all the time?” I tell them that kids inspire me almost every single day.

I also believe that the information and books they are exposed to influences their world view of hope and happiness. Like the old adage “garbage in, garbage out “, the opposite is also true. So, go get into some good stuff and have fun!