Strengthening Positive Parenting Practices During a Public Health Crisis (NASP Article)

Latino Dads Improve Parenting Skills By Reading To Their Kids : Shots - Health News : NPR

Strengthening Positive Parenting Practices During a Public Health Crisis
— Read on https://www.nasponline.org/resources-and-publications/resources-and-podcasts/covid-19-resource-center/special-education-resources/strengthening-positive-parenting-practices-during-a-public-health-crisis

Link to PDF: Here

Strengthening Positive Parenting Practices During a Public Health Crisis

PART 1: INTRODUCTION

During these times of stress and uncertainty, it can feel like our worlds have been turned upside down. This is not only true of service providers, students, and teachers, but also the families we serve. We know that increased stressors including job insecurity, housing insecurity, and generalized anxiety regarding health can impact the wellness of all members of the family system. Similarly, when one member of a family group is experiencing distress, this can cause shifts in the behavior, thinking, and relatedness of other members of the system (Bowen, 1966; Boyd-Franklin & Bry, 2012). With great levels of stress, risky parenting behaviors may come to the fore. Cumulatively, these risky parenting behaviors—even when they do not rise to the level of reportable abuse or neglect—remain a significant societal problem, and the likelihood for it to increase may be exacerbated by global crises and stressors.

In most cases, parents are able to maintain safe parenting practices, even during difficult times. A lot of parents are feeling overwhelmed and emotionally exhausted. In fact, many feel like they are not being the kind of parents they want to be or typically are. One of the first steps we can take in building partnerships is to validate and normalize parents’ reactions and experiences. Reminding parents that their feelings are normal reactions to a very abnormal situation can be invaluable. Alternatively, some parents are experiencing extraordinary distress, and they may make parenting choices that are less than optimal. In these situations, there may be a need to recognize and respond to suspicions of child maltreatment. The first step in responding to risky parenting practices is to work to enhance parenting capacity, to help families succeed and thrive. Understanding that parents and caregivers desire and want to be better parents is instrumental in helping them succeed (Prevent Child Abuse North Carolina, 2018). One of the most important roles of the school psychologist in supporting families is to mitigate risk factors and enhance protective factors. Such a framework can decrease the likelihood of abuse, maltreatment, and neglect and help families thrive.

Increasing Protective Factors

  1. Parental Resilience: Parenting is hard and all parents will encounter crises at some point, but parents who can weather the challenges and bounce back have safer, healthier children. School psychologists can promote parental resilience through promoting basic problem-solving skills, providing crisis support as needed, and helping parents access needed resources and community supports.
  2. Social Connections: Parenting is much easier if parents don’t do it all alone. Having a support network is important for a person’s social and emotional needs. Parents connected to community and friends are better able to meet children’s needs. Promoting virtual or phone contact between parents and support networks can ease parental distress, and can support and strengthen healthy parenting practices.
  3. Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development: Knowing what milestones are coming and how to effectively deal with them help prepare parents to care for their children. Knowledge of parenting and child development is like having directions to find your destination rather than hoping the signs you need will be clear and visible.
  4. Concrete Support in Times of Need: We all need a hand now and then. Parents who have dependable support and are not afraid to turn to others for help are less likely to be involved in abuse and neglect. Thus, supporting parents in reaching out to community supports can strengthen parental well-being and improve child-rearing practices.
  5. Social and Emotional Competence of Children: Many of the activities professionals do with children promote a child’s ability to interact positively with others and parents’ ability to nurture that development. Giving a child language to express his or her emotions, role modeling how to respond sensitively to a child, and promoting attachment and bonding between parents and children are all ways to help prevent child maltreatment (Prevent Child Abuse North Carolina, 2018).

PART 2: THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST

Begin with asking, “What can I do?” Many of us are feeling equally overwhelmed by the unexpected stressors brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Reflect on how you have functioned in your role and consider how your skills can be best utilized given the limitations of remote learning. Developing your own professional action plan will help you address the mountain of need one pebble at a time, thus helping you be more effective in your work and at the same time reducing unnecessary stress and anxiety that can arise out of uncertainty.

Action Plan

  1. Reflect on the needs of your individual school and the children/families you serve.
  2. Consider your role and function as a school psychologist within the present societal context.
  3. Identify ways in which you can support families and children proactively.
  4. Identify ways in which you can support teachers or other school officials as they engage with their students.
  5. Create weekly benchmarks and regularly review whether you are making progress toward goals.

As schools operate through a remote learning format, school psychologists can support families in managing stressors through both prevention and intervention frameworks. Our unique skill set equips us to examine our schools from the perspective of individuals and communities and help identify and connect those in need with the support necessary to help families maintain their emotional health. Be a STAR during this challenging time, and use this parent training practice to support the families you are working with.

Teach Your Parents to Stop, Think, Act, and Reflect Parent Response/Feedback to the Activity
S Stop: (A) Have the parent identify when they are about to lose their temper with their kids. Coach the parent to take a brief break before responding to their children. (B) Ask the parent: What has been causing you to “lose your cool” recently in your interactions with your kid(s)? (A)

 

 

(B)

T Think: (A) Have the parent identify alternative manners to respond to challenging child behaviors. (B) Ask the parent: How can you respond differently to your child(ren) when they behave in ways you believe are inappropriate? (A)

 

(B)

A Act: Have the parent try out their new strategy. (A) How did things go when you tried your new strategy? (A)
R Reflect: Have the parent reflect on what went right and what can be improved when they tried out their new response to their children’s challenging behavior(s).(A) What can you do differently next time to more effectively parent your child(ren) when they are engaging in this challenging behavior(s)? (A)

PART 3: PRACTICAL ACTION STEPS

Parents want what is best for their children. Unfortunately, stress and stressors can get in the way and impede healthy parenting. The COVID-19 pandemic is resulting in huge stress for families. Direct and indirect fallout from the pandemic can sometimes result in parents interacting with their children in ways they may later regret. Here are some tips school psychologists can share with stressed out parents during these difficult times.

Assessing Parenting Stress Levels

How parents handle stress, including the fallout from COVID-19, can contribute to risky parenting behaviors. One way to help parents is to teach them self-monitoring of their distress. Parents can rate their stress level, through a simple thermometer metaphor. Teach parents to ask themselves: “On a scale of 1–10, how stressed out am I feeling at the moment?” Have the parent identify two or three simple coping skills they regularly use, which they could use quickly and easily to destress. This includes brief activities such as listening to music, playing a video game, or taking a walk in the backyard. Set up a system where parents complete this self-assessment a few times throughout the day. When stress levels are high, have parents use one of their identified coping skills. You can find a feelings thermometer and many useful cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) worksheets online here. Also, reputable CBT and psychoeducation worksheets that can be helpful when working with parents and families can be found here.

In addition to assessing current stress levels, there are other steps we can take to better understand and address the needs of the families school psychologists support. As we seek to support all families, it may become apparent that specific families need more direct care. Your parents may find websites on how to start an individual mindfulness practice or on parental mindfulness helpful. To better understand these specific contextual needs of our families, consider the following.

  1. Assess parent/family stress and resources: Conduct a brief needs assessment to identify primary areas of concern (food insecurity, housing insecurity, stress management, managing remote learning, family dynamics). A needs assessment is a systematic process to identify or determine family needs, and to identify barriers impeding access to needed resources. Identifying the discrepancy between the current condition and the desired one should be prioritized by you as the school psychologist, so that you can provide the tools and resources that can best mitigate the discrepancies between current and desired conditions.
  2. Safety Plan: Support the family in developing a safety plan. This plan should clearly describe challenges to safety of family members and steps that can be taken to manage threats to a parent or child’s safety. A safety plan is designed to mitigate threats to a family member’s safety using the least intrusive means possible. Here is an example of a safety plan.
  3. Check in: Identify school personnel or other individuals who can conduct regular meetings with the family to assess family temperature and continue to clarify strengths and needs. This could be school or community social workers, case workers, or a trusted professional or community member with the training and expertise to help strengthen families.

Promote Positive Communication

Good communication between parents and children is critical for developing a positive parent–child relationship and for subsequent development. If you notice coercive, concerning, or poor quality communication or parenting behaviors occurring in the family home, work with the parent(s) to emphasize basic parent training strategies. Basic parent training strategies you can share with parents you are working with include:

  1. Praise: Teach parents to praise their kids regularly for demonstrating a strong effort or doing something right. Remind the parents you are supporting that the more frequently they praise a behavior, the more likely it is their child will behave the same way again.
  2. Mindful Parenting: Promote the value of present moment engagement as it pertains to parent–child interactions. Emphasize to parents that providing their full attention to their children, to what is happening in the here-and-now, will help them better understand what their children are thinking and feeling, lessen disagreement, and strengthen the parent–child bond.
  3. Active Listening: Active listening is a useful tool to promote positive parenting practices. When school psychologists provide psychoeducation on active listening, parents learn how to listen, both verbally and nonverbally, to strengthen their relationships with their children and others. Providing psychoeducation to parents regarding how to reflect back the words, sentiments, or emotions expressed by the child can make active listening particularly effective in promoting communication.
  4. Child-Led Play or Special Time Together: Reinforce to parents the power of time spent together with their children. Regular (even short) periods of play with younger children or parent–child activities with older children and adolescents can strengthen communication and the overall parent–child relationship.
  5. Ignoring: Ignoring can help quickly end attention-seeking behaviors such as whining or tantrums. Ignoring is an active practice. This will require ongoing work and support with parents. However, teaching parents to ignore attention seeking behaviors can help end challenging behaviors by the child early, before they escalate and cause upheaval within the household. You as the school psychologist should work with the parent to teach them how to remove attention from the child and the negative behavior(s) they are exhibiting, to promote stress and relaxation within the household.

PART 4: INTENSIVE AND INDIVIDUALIZED INTERVENTION

Even with robust support and interventions in place, there is a possibility that a small portion of the populations we serve may need more intensive interventions. The number of families who are engaging in risky parenting behaviors and who are at risk for engaging in child maltreatment or abuse may increase during times of global crisis. Intensive, individualized interventions—either immediately or at a later date—may be necessary for some families. When appropriate, the school psychologist may be able to provide these services directly. Your role also may include consultation and referral of the family to more focused and specialized clinical and community-based supports. While there are a wide range of choices to consider in intensive interventions, a sample of evidence-based interventions that may have utility in supporting families in distress who may be engaging in risky parenting behaviors include the following.

Interventions Focused on Young Children Birth to Age 5

  1. Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC)
  2. Child–Parent Psychotherapy (CPP)
  3. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
  4. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Preschoolers (MTFC)
  5. The Incredible Years* (IY)
  6. Triple-P* (PPP)

*Modules and research also support these programs with older children (i.e., middle childhood and adolescence).

Interventions Focused on Middle Childhood and Adolescence

  1. Trauma-Focused Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy
  2. Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy
  3. Multisystemic Therapy – for Child Abuse and Neglect
  4. DBT Skills

PART 5: ENSURING CHILD AND FAMILY SAFETY

The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting families in unalterable ways. For many families, loss of employment, social isolation, and myriad other challenges brought forward through the pandemic are increasing family distress. These challenges will likely continue and possibly even worsen in the coming months. School psychologists will encounter family dynamics in new and profound manners through teletherapy. While most encounters will be adaptive, healthy, or even humorous, others may expose the school psychologist to the escalating stress and challenges experienced by many families. At times such unwitting encounters may even result in school psychologists who witness events, interactions, or behaviors that rise to the level of a reportable offense. Remember, as school psychologists we are all mandated reporters. Thus, we must be prepared to contact our statewide child protective services office should we observe anything in the home through teletherapy services that raises a reasonable suspicion of child maltreatment.

Parents and families generally want what is best for their children. When parents and caregivers are under duress, their ability to engage in healthy parenting practices may decline. It is important that we consider the robust and broad risk and protective factors that may impact child rearing and caregiving capabilities. During times of global health or related crises, such as COVID-19, school psychologists play a key role in strengthening families. With their breadth and depth of knowledge, school psychologists must strive to use their skills to promote healthy parenting behaviors.

RESOURCES: Help and Safety Contacts/Hotlines

References

Boyd-Franklin, N., & Bry, B. H. (2012). Reaching out in family therapy: Home-based, school, and community interventions. Guilford Press.

Bowen, M. (1966). The use of family theory in clinical practice. Comprehensive psychiatry, 7(5), 345–374.

Prevent Child Abuse, North Carolina. (2018). Recognizing and Responding to Suspicions of Child Maltreatment: A Training for Adults Working with Children and Families. (Retrieved from https://preventchildabusenc-lms.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/RR-full_2018.pdf)

Contributors: Kirby Wycoff, Michele Messer, and Aaron Gubi

Please cite as: National Association of School Psychologists. (2020). Strengthening positive parenting practices during a public health crisis [handout]. Author.

© 2020, National Association of School Psychologists, 4340 East West Highway, Suite 402, Bethesda, MD 20814, 301-657-0270, http://www.nasponline.org

SEL THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING FROM IFSEL

IFSEL’s RESOURCE LIST TO SUPPORT

SEL THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING

We hope the following curated list of curriculum materials, articles, blogs, poetry and other resources will give you practical tools, inspiration, ideas, research, and more to empower you to support the emotional health and wellbeing of your community while keeping alive the SEL in virtual classrooms. We’ve done our best to divide the resources into categories. Most of what you will find here is relevant for K-12  and also for the adults and families in your communities. 

RESOURCES FOR SCHOOLS 

A New REALM – IFSEL’s Tips for Distance Learning Blog (IFSEL)

Weekly “Teach Meets” hosted by IFSEL

Don’t Worry about Academic Learning Lost from Covid (American Institute of Learning and Human Development

A Trauma Informed Approach to Teaching Through Coronavirus (Teaching Tolerance)

Online Team-Building Games Guide (Michelle Cummings)

Laughter, Learning, and Why Teens are such a Tough Crowd (Edutopia)

Wide Open School (Curated Resources from Common Sense Media)

The Discomfort You’re Feeling is Grief   (Harvard Business Review)

Mindfulness for Zoom Exhaustion  (Mindful)

Why Learning at Home should be more Self Directed and Less Structured (Edutopia)

Living History Journal  (Cathryn Stout)

4 Tips for Teachers Switching to Online Learning (Edutopia)

NAIS: Tips for setting up Temporary Distance Learning at Your School (National Association of Independent Schools)

Resource Hub for Remote Learning for Special Education Students (Education Weekly)

Elementary Ideas for Students at Home (We are Teachers)

What Teachers in China Have Learned in the Past Month (Edutopia)

Supporting Gender Expansive Kids in Times of Covid-19 (Gender Spectrum has multiple resources for youth, parents and educators. Please share with all students because you may not know who is transgender or non-binary.)

What Trans People Need to Know re: Coronavirus (Transgender Equality Project)

Flexibility in the Midst of Crisis (Psychology Today)

Overall Tips and LInks to Online Learning Resources (Hong Kong Academy)

Online Learning Resources for Teachers (Common Sense Media)

Learning from Home Resources (New Schools)

Insights for Online Learning (Teach for All)

What do we need to teach now? (Inside Higher Ed)

Coping with Disrupted Routines (Christine Carter)

Ok Go Videos and behind the scenes

Go Noodle!

RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS:

Letter from Teacher to High School Seniors

Covid 19 Toolkit – for Teenagers and Parents (Stressed Teens)

Regulating Emotions in a Covid-19 World (Tom Hollenstein)

Just For Kids: A Comic Exploring The New Coronavirus  (NPR)

Free Mindfulness Classes for Elementary Students (Mindful Schools)

Kids Around the World are Reading NPRs Coronavirus Comic  NPR

When Xenophobia Spreads Like A Virus – Codeswitch by NPR

The Social Distancing Cardio Workout (No Equipment))

Coronavirus: Protect Yourself and Stand Against Racism  (Facing History)

Brainpop Video re: Coronavirus

RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES  

How to have Family Meetings to Solve Conflict during Lockdown  (NY Times)

5 Killers of Your Child’s Creativity geared towards life during SIP – Institute for Learning and Human Development

How to Help Teen Shelter in Place (Christine Carter)

How to Help Pre-Teens in the Coronavirus Lockdown (Quartz)

The National Association of School Psychologist (NASP)- Guidelines for talking with children about COVID-19. (NASP)

How to Talk to Kids About Corona Virus  (New York Times)

Coronavirus, Wildfires, Oh My: What to Say to a Child Who’s Scared By the News,  (Steve Calechman)

Stigma and Resilience (CDC)

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 (CDC)

Keeping Learning in Challenging Times  (International School of Beijing)

Supporting kids academically during home learning  (Lisa Oefinger)

How to Talk to Kids and Teens About the Coronavirus – (Psychology Today)

Common Sense Media Resources for Parents re: Online Learning

Hand in Hand Parenting – Supporting Children during Sheltering In

Friendship Is Crucial to the Adolescent Brain (The Atlantic)

Using Social & Emotional Learning in Times of Stress (CDC)

Virus Anxiety (Take Care)

Stop Romanticizing Lockdown; it’s a Mental Health Crisis in the Making (Elephant Journal)

EQUITY AND INCLUSION

Speaking up against Racism during Coronavirus (Teaching Tolerance)

What about Children who are Disconnected? (Brookings)

When Xenophobia Spreads Like A Virus – Codeswitch by NPR

Coronavirus: Protect Yourself and Stand Against Racism  (Facing History)

What Trans People Need to Know re: Coronavirus (Transgender Equality Project)

A Trauma Informed Approach to Teaching Through Coronavirus (Teaching Tolerance Magazine)

Supporting Gender Expansive Kids in Times of Covid-19 (Gender Spectrum has multiple resources for youth, parents and educators. Please share with all students becuase you may not know who is transgender or non-binary.)

Social Distancing is a Privilege  (Optionon: Charles Bow)

GENERAL EDUCATION RESOURCES  

ReflEQ  – SEL and meta-skills for subject teaching 

Resources for Learning at Home (Captain Planet) – Nature and Science

Biomimicry Youth Challenge

PE with Coach Wood YouTube

Art at Home

Storycorps

Museum Virtual Tours

Wow in the World (NPR Podcast)

Podcasts 

Brains On: Forever Ago

Broadway Plays, etc. 

INSPIRATION

“Pandemic” (Poem by Lynn Unger)

Creating a Home Retreat: Finding Freedom Wherever you Are (Jack Kornfield)

Encouraging Songs of Comfort amid Global Crisis  (Yo Yo Ma)

A Steady Heart in the Time of Coronavirus (Video Tara Brach & J. Kornfield)

Compassion in the time of Coronavirus (Jack Kornfield)

Poems for Shelter in Place (Poets.org)

Anxiety App (Free)

So you like the rest of us you are cooped up because of COVID-19 and might be feeling anxiety. Here is an App that helps you log what you are feeling, the accompanying symptoms, and solutions to help manage your feelings.

MINDSHIFT CBT

Link for Android

MindShift™ CBT

MindShift CBT for iOS and AndroidFree Evidence-Based Mental Health Relief

Is anxiety getting in the way of your life? MindShift™ CBT uses scientifically proven strategies based on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) to help you learn to relax and be mindful, develop more effective ways of thinking, and use active steps to take charge of your anxiety.

Get the tools to tackle:

  • Worry
  • Panic
  • Perfectionism
  • Social Anxiety
  • Phobias

MindShift™ CBT Features:

CBT-BASED TOOLS

Interactive cognitive-based tools to help you reorient your thinking, and behavioural strategies to help you take action and make lasting positive change.

QUICK RELIEF

When you need anxiety help fast, use these quick and easy tools to help you take a breath, ground yourself, shift your thinking, and take steps to cope.

THOUGHT JOURNAL

Transform your worries into balanced and helpful thoughts by identifying and challenging thinking that keeps you trapped in anxiety.

COPING CARDS

Ease your anxiety in the moment by re-adjusting your thinking with helpful coping statements.

BELIEF EXPERIMENTS

Learn how to set up experiments to test out beliefs that fuel anxiety.

FACING FEARS

Overcome your fears by gradually facing them in small manageable steps.

EXPANDING YOUR COMFORT ZONE

Build your confidence by consistently doing new and challenging things.

CHILL ZONE

Listen to audio recordings of guided relaxation and mindfulness meditations to help you get, and stay, in a more relaxed and mindful headspace.

CHECK-IN

Keep track of your anxiety and mood over time with graphs and journal entries.

HEALTHY HABITS

Tips to set the stage to better manage anxiety by taking better care of yourself.

GOAL SETTING

Tools and tips to help you set and accomplish important life goals and keep anxiety in check. Reminders to keep you motivated and on track.

COVID-19 aka The Corona Virus Just Shut Down Our School District

Schools are closed now county wide in Santa Cruz California starting next week. This pandemic just got really real. Wash your hands and stay out of crowds here comes the Corona Virus. Here is the note from our Superintendent.

Good Evening PVUSD staff, 

The safety and wellness of students, families, and school personnel are the highest priorities of all Santa Cruz County schools and districts. Yesterday, we received notification of the first confirmed case of COVID-19 at Rio Del Mar Elementary School. In advance of more COVID-19 cases that are anticipated to follow, School District Superintendents and the Santa Cruz County Office of Education have decided in concurrence with the Santa Cruz County Health Services Agency to close all public Santa Cruz County schools for the week of March 16-20. We will reassess at the end of next week whether an extension of school closures beyond March 20th will be necessary. Santa Cruz County Public Health Officer, Dr. Gail Newel, reported that while the number of cases in our county remains small at this time, the Santa Cruz County Public Health Division expects those numbers to grow significantly in the coming days and weeks which may require a continued response. Schools will remain in session tomorrow, March 13, 2020. Please see the attached community letter with more information. A staff letter will follow with additional information regarding the upcoming week.
Thank you,
Michelle Rodriguez, Ed.D.
Superintendent

Resources

Education based COVID-19 (“Coronavirus”) Information and Resources for Schools and School Personnel

Social Distancing

Taking Time for Curiosity At School.

“The important thing is not to stop questioning. Curiosity has its own reason for existing.” — Albert Einstein

curiosity-and-creativity-1024x640

I was thinking the other day, “What makes schooling more personalized for a student?” and I thought about my time with students and it was definitely the hook of curiosity. The world is a fascinating place and learning can become really exciting with the priming students wonder of a topic.

General

Introduction: How to Cultivate the Curiosity Classroom -ASCD Article

Why is inquiry important for student learning? Curiosity Cultivator

5 Learning Strategies That Make Students Curious

10 Strategies To Promote Curiosity In Learning

Curiosity: It Helps Us Learn, But Why?

 

strategies-curiosity-learning

the-6-steps-of-curiosity-based-learning

stripling

Quotes

THE MIND THAT OPENS TO A NEW IDEA NEVER RETURNS TO ITS ORIGINAL SIZE.

Albert Einstein

RESEARCH IS FORMALIZED CURIOSITY. IT IS POKING AND PRYING WITH A PURPOSE.

Zora Neale Hurston

ALL KNOWLEDGE IS CONNECTED TO ALL OTHER KNOWLEDGE. THE FUN IS IN MAKING THE CONNECTIONS.

Arthur Aufderheide

THE POWER TO QUESTION IS THE BASIS OF ALL HUMAN PROGRESS.

Indira Gandhi

PROGRESS IS BORN OF DOUBT AND INQUIRY.

Robert G. Ingersoll

NEVER BE LIMITED BY OTHER PEOPLE’S LIMITED IMAGINATIONS.

Mae Jemison

SKEPTICISM IS THE FIRST STEP TOWARDS TRUTH.

Denis Diderot

MAKE THE MOST OF YOURSELF BY FANNING THE TINY, INNER SPARKS OF POSSIBILITY INTO FLAMES OF ACHIEVEMENT.

Golda Meir

WE MUST DARE TO THINK ABOUT ‘UNTHINKABLE THINGS’ BECAUSE WHEN THINGS BECOME ‘UNTHINKABLE’, THINKING STOPS AND ACTION BECOMES MINDLESS.

J. William Fulbright

IT IS A NARROW MIND WHICH CANNOT LOOK AT A SUBJECT FROM VARIOUS POINTS OF VIEW.

George Eliot

IT WOULD BE BETTER FOR US TO HAVE SOME DOUBTS IN AN HONEST PURSUIT OF TRUTH, THAN IT WOULD BE FOR US TO BE CERTAIN ABOUT SOMETHING THAT WAS NOT TRUE.

Daniel Wallace

A MAP DOES NOT JUST CHART, IT UNLOCKS AND FORMULATES MEANING; IT FORMS BRIDGES BETWEEN HERE AND THERE, BETWEEN DISPARATE IDEAS THAT WE DID NOT KNOW WERE PREVIOUSLY CONNECTED.

Reif Larsen

FROM THE SMALLEST NECESSITY TO THE HIGHEST RELIGIOUS ABSTRACTION, FROM THE WHEEL TO THE SKYSCRAPER, EVERYTHING WE ARE AND EVERYTHING WE HAVE COMES FROM ONE ATTRIBUTE OF MAN – THE FUNCTION OF HIS REASONING MIND.

Ayn Rand

MILLIONS SAW THE APPLE FALL, BUT NEWTON ASKED WHY.

Bernard Baruch

CURIOSITY IS A WILLING, A PROUD, AND EAGER CONFESSION OF IGNORANCE.

S.Leonard Rubinstein

JUDGE A MAN BY HIS QUESTIONS RATHER THAN BY HIS ANSWERS.

Voltaire

THE FOCUS IS WHAT IS RIGHT BEFORE YOU–TO GIVE IT YOUR BEST. IT SOWS THE SEEDS OF TOMORROW.

Kiran Bedi

CURIOSITY IS THE WICK IN THE CANDLE OF LEARNING.

William Arthur Ward

SCIENCE IS FUN. SCIENCE IS CURIOSITY. WE ALL HAVE NATURAL CURIOSITY. SCIENCE IS A PROCESS OF INVESTIGATING. IT’S POSING QUESTIONS AND COMING UP WITH A METHOD. IT’S DELVING IN.

Sally Ride

DON’T LOOK AT YOUR FEET TO SEE IF YOU ARE DOING IT RIGHT. JUST DANCE.

Anne Lamott

CURIOSITY WILL CONQUER FEAR EVEN MORE THAN BRAVERY WILL.

James Stephens

THERE ARE NO FOOLISH QUESTIONS, AND NO MAN BECOMES A FOOL UNTIL HE HAS STOPPED ASKING QUESTIONS.

Charles Proteus Steinmetz

I THINK, AT A CHILD’S BIRTH, IF A MOTHER COULD ASK A FAIRY GODMOTHER TO ENDOW IT WITH THE MOST USEFUL GIFT, THAT GIFT WOULD BE CURIOSITY.

Eleanor Roosevelt

BEWARE OF MONOTONY; IT’S THE MOTHER OF ALL THE DEADLY SINS.

Edith Wharton

KNOWING THE ANSWERS WILL HELP YOU IN SCHOOL. KNOWING HOW TO QUESTION WILL HELP YOU IN LIFE.

Warren Berger

Parenting Classes Through “Triple P”

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TRIPLE P IN A NUTSHELL

The Triple P – Positive Parenting Program ® is a parenting and family support system designed to prevent – as well as treat – behavioral and emotional problems in children and teenagers. It aims to prevent problems in the family, school, and community before they arise and to create family environments that encourage children to realize their potential.

Triple P draws on social learning, cognitive behavioral and developmental theory as well as research into risk factors associated with the development of social and behavioral problems in children. It aims to equip parents with the skills and confidence they need to be self-sufficient and to be able to manage family issues without ongoing support.

 

And while it is almost universally successful in improving behavioral problems, more than half of Triple P’s 17 parenting strategies focus on developing positive relationships, attitudes, and conduct.

 

Triple P is delivered to parents of children up to 12 years, with Teen Triple P for parents of 12 to 16-year-olds. There are also specialist programs – for parents of children with a disability (Stepping Stones), for parents going through separation or divorce (Family Transitions), for parents of children who are overweight (Lifestyle) and for Indigenous parents (Indigenous). Other specialist programs are being trialed or are in development.

BENEFITS OF TRIPLE P

Triple P is unlike any other parenting program in the world, with benefits both clinical and practical.

Flexible delivery

Triple P’s flexibility sets it apart from many other parenting interventions. Triple P has flexibility in:

Age range and special circumstance

Triple P can cater to an entire population — for children from birth to 16 years. There are also specialist programs – including programs for parents of children with a disability; parents of children with health or weight concerns; parents going through divorce or separation; and for Indigenous families.

Intensity of program

Triple P’s distinctive multi-level system is the only one of its kind, offering a suite of programs of increasing intensity, each catering to a different level of family need or dysfunction, from “light-touch” parenting help to highly targeted interventions for at-risk families.

How it’s delivered

Just as the type of programs within the Triple P system differ, so do the settings in which the programs are delivered – personal consultations, group courses, larger public seminars and online and other self-help interventions are all available.

Who can be trained to deliver

Practitioners come from a wide range of professions and disciplines and include family support workers, doctors, nurses, psychologists, counselors, teachers, teacher’s aides, police officers, social workers, child safety officers and clergy.

Evidence based

Triple P is the most extensively researched parenting program in the world. Developed by clinical psychologist Professor Matt Sanders and his colleagues at Australia’s University of Queensland, Triple P is backed by more than 35 years’ ongoing research, conducted by academic institutions in the U.S., the U.K., Canada, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Iran, Hong Kong, Japan, Turkey, New Zealand and Australia.

Population approach

Triple P has been designed as a population-based health approach to parenting, typically implemented by jurisdictions, government bodies or NGOs (non-government organizations) across regions or countries. The aim is to reach as many people as possible to have the greatest preventative impact on a community. The Triple P system can go to scale simply and cost efficiently. It has been shown to work with many different cultures and ethnicities.

Comprehensive resources

All Triple P interventions are supported with comprehensive, professionally produced resources for both practitioners and parents. The resources have all been clinically trialled and tested. The parent resources have been translated, variously, from English into 21 languages.

Organizational support

Triple P’s dissemination experts around the world have experience assisting all levels of government and non-government organizations and are available to advise through all stages of a Triple P rollout – from planning and training to delivery, evaluation and beyond. Triple P uses an Implementation Framework to help support the success and sustainability of Triple P.

Communications strategy

An integrated communications strategy, which helps destigmatize parenting support and reaches parents via a range of communications materials, puts parenting on the public agenda. It creates an awareness and acceptance of parenting support in general – and Triple P specifically.

Evaluation measures

The success of Triple P is easily monitored on both a personal level and across a population. Triple P provides tools for practitioners to measure “before” and “after” results with parents, allowing them to demonstrate Triple P’s effectiveness to the parents they work with and also to their own managers. computerized scoring applications can also be adapted to collate results across a region to show effects community-wide or within a target group.

Cost effective

Triple P’s system works to prevent overservicing and wastage, with its range of programs able to cater to the diversity of parents’ needs – from light-touch to intense intervention. It’s also a program that promotes self-regulation and self-sufficiency, as Triple P gives parents the skills they need to become problem solvers and confidently manage their issues independently, rather than rely on the ongoing support of a practitioner.

 

On a broader scale, as an early intervention strategy, Triple P has been shown to reduce costs associated with conduct disorder, child abuse and out-of-home placement, delivering significant benefits when compared to the cost of the program. Read more about Triple P’s cost efficiency.

LOCAL CONTACTS

If you represent an agency, organization, jurisdiction or government and would like to discuss implementing Triple P in your region, or inquire about training your staff to deliver Triple P to parents, please contact:

U.S.A.

Triple P America Inc.
1201 Lincoln St, Suite 201
Columbia, SC, 29201, USA
contact.us@triplep.net
+1-803-451 2278

Australia

Triple P International Pty Ltd
11 Market Street North
Indooroopilly, QLD 4068, AU
contact@triplep.net
+61-7-3236 1212

Canada

Triple P Parenting Canada Inc.
contact.canada@triplep.net
+1-647-822-8772

Germany

Triple P Deutschland
info@triplep.de
+49-0251-1621248

Latin America

Triple P Latin America
francisca@triplep.net
+56-97-879 4832

New Zealand

Triple P New Zealand Limited
infonz@triplep.net
+64-9-579 1794

United Kingdom

Triple P UK Limited
contact@triplep.uk.net
+44-207-987 2944

All other countries

Triple P International Pty Ltd
contact@triplep.net
+61-7-3236 1212

Links

Triple P Online – Overview PDF

YouTube Triple P – Positive Parenting Program

Santa Cruz County Triple P Website

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Giving Students The Words to Build a Positive Mindset

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I feel that now more then ever a balance needs to be set for students in building their own sense of well being in times of adversity. Many students are aware of their deficits and often times lose sight of the greater goals of retaining a balanced view of themselves over the perceived expectations and judgments teachers and parents may project on to their young learners. As a parent and educator, I am guilty of this as well. In an effort to bring more positivity to those I encounter, I wrote this post to help myself and others better cultivate positive mindset ideas and practices. In some circles, they say to start with a “beginners mind”. I take this as staying curious and not judging ones own learning curve taking knowledge as it comes and being gentle with yourself throughout the learning process.

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9 P’s for Affirmation Creation

When creating positive affirmations,
keep in mind that they should be:

 PRESENT  Set in the present tense
 POSITIVE  No negative words
 PERSONAL  Tailored to you
 PRECISE  Detailed and specific
 POWERFUL  Empowering words
 PUNCHY  Short and concise
 PLAUSIBLE  Realistic statements
 PRIVATE  Can keep to yourself daily
 PERSISTENT  Use even if not true yet

Adapted from Works by Che Garman

Source

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Positive Affirmations for Students

  1. Today and Everyday My Thirst For Learning is Alive And Well in Me
  2. I Am a Great Student And Getting Better Each And Every Day
  3. I Am Prepared For My Tests, I Love Taking Tests, Tests Are a Breeze For Me
  4. Today I Study Hard So Tomorrow I Can Make My Difference.
  5. Education is The Path to Freedom, And Today I Will Walk That Path With Confidence.
  6. I Value My Education Because It Prepares Me For a Bright And Successful Future
  7. I Am Always Open To Learning in a Better Way
  8. A Chance To Learn is a Chance To Grow. I Am Growing
  9. Some Days our Progress Is Small But our Learning Is Much
  10. I Choose To Move Forward Every Day , Growing And Learning As I Go
  11. I Set High Standards For My Educational Experience And I Achieve Them
  12. I Am Smart And Today I Prove It
  13. Learning is Life, I love Learning And I Am Good at It
  14. The More I Learn The More I Achieve
  15. I Am And Being a Student is All About The Possible

Source

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Empty your mind, be formless. Shapeless, like water. If you put water into a cup, it becomes the cup. You put water into a bottle and it becomes the bottle. You put it in a teapot it becomes the teapot. Now, water can flow or it can crash. Be water, my friend.

OLD SCHOOL VS. 21st Century Learning

Learning is different and we have to look at building flexibility because of the new way we present information and teach concepts in school. Look at the chart below that helps to illustrate old school versus 21st-century learning.
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