Hearing Loss in School

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The National Dissemination Center for Children with Disabilities (NICHCY) explains that hearing loss falls into four subcategories: conductive, sensorineural, mixed and central. These identify the location in the body in which the hearing impairment occurs. Hearing aids and other sound amplifying assistive technologies (AT) often work for students with conductive hearing loss, as their impairments stem from the outer or middle ear. Such does not hold true with sensorineural, mixed and central hearing losses, as these impairments stem from the inner ear, the central nervous system or a combination of the two. Typically, hearing loss is categorized as slight, mild, moderate, severe or profound, depending on how well an individual can hear the frequencies that are commonly associated with speech.

Educational Challenges

Educational obstacles related to hearing impairments stem around communication. A student with a hearing impairment may experience difficulty in:

  • the subjects of grammar, spelling and vocabulary
  • taking notes while listening to lectures
  • participating in classroom discussions
  • watching educational videos
  • presenting oral reports

Underscoring the difficulty that students with hearing impairments may have in presenting oral reports are the potential language development problems linked to hearing impairments. Arizona’s Department of Education’s Parent Information Network notes that, “Since children with hearing impairments are unable to receive some sounds accurately, they often cannot articulate words clearly.”

Source

Hearing Impairment Topic Categories via-

 The National Association of Special Education Teachers (NASET)

Accommodations Adults with Hearing Impairments
Advocacy Assessment
Assistive Technology Audio/Video Tapes
Books and Publications Causes
Characteristics Classifications
Classroom Management Definition
Diagnosis Frequently Asked Questions
History of the Field Medical Issues/Medication
Organizations Overview
Parent Information Prevalence
Transition Services

Resources

Accessibility Considerations Worksheet For Students with Hearing Loss

Article- The Cascading Impact of Hearing Loss on Access to School Communication Fragmented Hearing -> Effort -> Listening Comprehension -> Fatigue -> Pace of Learning It’s About Access, Not Hearing Loss

Causes of Hearing Loss in Children

Students with Hearing Impairment in the School Setting ASHA Practice Policy documents

 

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Epilepsy in Schools

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Epilepsy is a common disorder of the brain that causes recurring seizures.  Epilepsy affects people of all ages, but children and older adults are more likely to have epilepsy. Seizures are the main sign of epilepsy and most people can control this with treatment. Some seizures can look like staring spells while other seizures can cause a person to collapse, stiffen or shake, and become unaware of what’s going on around them. Many times the cause is unknown.

About 0.6% of children ages 0-17 years have epilepsy in the United States. 2 That is about 460,000 children in 2013.1 Picture a school with 1,000 students—that means about 6 students would have epilepsy. For many children, epilepsy is easily controlled with medication and they can do what all the other kids can do, and perform as well academically.  For others, it can be more challenging.

Compared with students with other health concerns, a CDC study shows that students aged 6–17 years with epilepsy were more likely to miss 11 or more days of school in the past year. Also, students with epilepsy were more likely to have difficulties in school, use special education services, and have activity limitations such as less participation in sports or clubs compared with students with other medical conditions. CDC also found that a larger percentage of children with epilepsy than those without the disorder lived in very low income households (below 200% of the federal poverty level). This suggests other unmet needs for families of children with epilepsy.

Source CDC

Generalized Seizures
(Produced by the entire brain)
Symptoms
1. “Grand Mal” or Generalized tonic-clonic Unconsciousness, convulsions, muscle rigidity
2. Absence Brief loss of consciousness
3. Myoclonic Sporadic (isolated), jerking movements
4. Clonic Repetitive, jerking movements
5. Tonic Muscle stiffness, rigidity
6. Atonic Loss of muscle tone

General Resources

MANAGING CHILDREN WITH EPILEPSY SCHOOL NURSE GUIDE

Plans

SEIZURE ACTION PLAN FOR SCHOOL (Fill in PDF form)

Seizure Action Plan with Emergency Seizure Care Instructions

MODEL SECTION 504 PLAN FOR A STUDENT WITH EPILEPSY (Sample)

For professionals

Epilepsy Foundation – Managing Students with Seizures for School Nurses

Epilepsy Foundation – Seizure Training for School Personnel

Epilepsy Foundation – Seizure Training for Child Care Personnel

For Students and Families

CDC – You Are Not Alone Parent Toolkit

Epilepsy Foundation – Take Charge of the Storm for middle school students

Epilepsy Foundation – Take Charge of the Facts for high school students

Kid Books

Using the lens of the Search Institute’s “40 Developmental Assets” to support student outcomes

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Developmental Assets

Developmental Assets help children grow into caring, engaged, and responsible adults. Developmental Assets include the internal character strengths and commitments young people need as well as the external supports and opportunities they need from their families, schools, organizations, and communities.

Search Institute introduced the framework in 1990 and, since then, has studied developmental assets in more that 5 million youth across North America and around the world. The approach focuses on young people’s strengths and working across the many parts of their lives to support their growth and successful development. Hundreds of schools, coalitions, and other organizations have used the developmental assets as a guiding framework for their youth development efforts. Source

Questions

WHAT IS IT?
Asset Building, Resiliency and Youth Development and are philosophies and strategies for creating youth-centered environments that prioritize the positive development of young people.

WHY USE IT?
Research and practitioner experience has proven that a positive school day and after school environment that intentionally develops youth’s assets and adopts a youth development approach can provide the experiences and skills that youth need to develop into healthy adults.

WHEN TO USE IT?
Utilizing an asset building, resiliency and youth development based approach is effective in planning and facilitating all aspects of school day and after school programs. The approach can be used:
As the foundation of your school’s philosophy to establish emotionally, physically safe and engaging learning environments; As a framework for creating engaging classroom, program structures and activities that offer meaningful participation, build skills and expose youth to new opportunities and resources; As an approach for increasing youth involvement and youth buy in to lesson and activity components; As a professional development component or part of a job orientation for all staff.
HOW IT IS USED:
Below are three philosophies of asset building, resiliency and youth development that are often referred to by school sites, local city agencies and community based organizations.
SFUSD- School Health Programs Department encourages the following Asset Building, Resiliency and Youth Development core principles for working with young people as measured by the California Healthy Kids Survey (CHKS):

Young people have the capacity to develop and transform as they move toward adulthood.
Young people are genetically intended to develop and are actively seeking to meet their own needs.
All young people need the same types of positive resources:
-Caring, Respectful Relationships
-High, Clear and Fair Expectations
-Meaningful Opportunities to Participate and Contribute
All young people need adults in their lives.

Source

PROCESS

First, the kids take a pretest called the DAP (Link). The school gets the results to help direct efforts to support students at their school based on the needs represented by the child responses. The school chooses activities to carry out throughout the year to intervene with the needs. Finally, a posttest of the DAP is given to measure the growth of the schools’ efforts to address the needs identified in the pretest DAP.

DAP QUICK REFERENCE

Length: 58 questions

Average Completion Rate:10 minutes
(Add at least 10 minutes for general instructions and collection.)

Youth: 4-12 grade; ages 9-18

Minimum youth needed for report: 30

Minimum time between Pre and Post: 3 months

Source

 

Need a Copy of the 40 Developmental Assets?

These documents are provided, compliments of the Search Institute. Click on the links to download PDF copies of 40 Developmental Assets lists for different developmental stages and in different languages.

These pages may be reproduced for educational, noncommercial uses only. Copyright © 1997, 2006 by Search Institute, 615 First Avenue N.E.,Suite 125, Minneapolis, MN 55413; 800-888-7828; search-institute.org. All Rights Reserved.

The following are registered trademarks of Search Institute: Search Institute®, Developmental Assets® and Healthy Communities • Healthy Youth®.

Asset Checklist

Assets for Different Developmental Stages

Assets in Alternate Languages

Please note, these asset lists were compiled by Healthy Communities, Healthy Youth sites across the United States. They represent volunteer efforts. Assets lists in alternate stages for different developmental levels are not available for every language.

Would you like to learn more about the Search Institute and their work with the 40 Developmental Assets? Click here to check out their website!

Inclusion on the Playground

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WHAT IS AN INCLUSIVE PLAYGROUND?
An inclusive playground addresses the needs of all people including those who have autism, intellectual disabilities, hearing impairments, cerebral palsy, spina bifida and other disabilities. It also addresses the needs of typical children. An inclusive playground accommodates everyone and challenges them at their own developmental level. Source

After school how do I find an Inclusive Playground?

Playgrounds For Everyone A community-edited guide to accessible playgrounds. 

Resource list

(courtesy of AAA State of Play in the article “How-To Accommodate Special Needs Children on the Playground”)

Follow these links to learn more about accommodating special-needs children on the playground:

Child Sexual Abuse

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So as many of you may know, I write my blog posts in conjunction with events that occur at my school sites. This post has been the most difficult to date. The size and scope of an incident like this occurring on an elementary campus is devastating. I really encourage that parents, teachers, and community members at large help to teach our kids the tools and skills to stay safe.

Fact Sheets

Child Sexual Abuse Fact Sheet

Child Sexual Abuse: YOU CAN PREVENT, RECOGNIZE AND REACT

Brochure English

Straight Talk About Child Sexual Abuse: A Prevention Guide for Parents

Spanish Resources

Abuso Sexual de Niños: UD. PUEDE PREVENIRLO, RECONOCERLO Y REACCIONAR

Hablando Claro Acerca Del Abuso Sexual Infantil: Una Guía Preventiva Para Los Padres

Brochure Spanish 

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Adult education is key to preventing child sexual abuse.

1 out of 10 children will be sexually abused before they turn 18. Chances are, someone you know has been impacted. Research shows that people who are sexually violated as children are far more likely to experience psychological problems often lasting into adulthood, including post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression, suicide, substance abuse, teen pregnancy, school dropout and relationship problems. (Source)

Parent Education

5 STEPS TO PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN  (PDF One Sheet)

Child Sexual Abuse Prevention FACTS:

 

 

Resources for recognizing sexual abuse:

Talking to your child about sexual abuse.

Talking to Children About Sexual Abuse Great sections on ages 4-8, 9-13, and 14-18. Explicitly lays out “What to do?” What to Say?”

By: Sean Brotherson, Ph.D., Family Science Specialist, NDSU Extension Service

10 WAYS TO TEACH YOUR CHILD BODY SAFETY: PREVENTING SEXUAL ABUSE

TALKING TO YOUR CHILD ABOUT MOLESTATION

How To Talk About Sexual Abuse Safety Webpage with more information

KidsPower Resources

7 Kidpower Strategies for Keeping Your Child Safe – Video Series

Four Strategies for Protecting Kids from Sexual Predators

Touch in Healthy Relationships

Circles of Intimacy

Circles of Intimacy-PDF

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Phone Apps

Stewards of Children Prevention Toolkit

Circles of Intimacy

Radio Show

LISTEN TO THE PARENTING TODAY RADIO SHOW: PREVENTING CHILD SEXUAL ABUSE

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Books

bodysafetybook

Body Smart, Body Safe: Talking with Young Children about their Bodies- Blog List of Books from A Mighty Girl

Books To Educate Children About Preventing Sexual Abuse

It’s My Body
by Lory Freeman (Parenting Press, 1984)

Keeping Kids Safe: A Child Sexual Abuse Prevention Manual
by Pnina Tobin, Sue Levinson Kessner (Hunter House Publishers; 2nd edition, 2002)

The Most Important Rule of All
by Pam Church
(Prevention And Motivation Programs, Inc., 1997) This book is a read-aloud storybook about child sexual abuse and protection skills for use with children ages 4-8 years.

Order here

My Body is Private
by Linda Walvoord Girard and Rodney Pate (Albert Whitman & Co., 1992)

The Right Touch: A Read-Aloud Book to Help Prevent Child Sexual Abuse
by Sandy Kleven (Illumination Arts Publishing, 1998)

Telling Isn’t Tattling
by Kathryn Hammerseng (Parenting Press, 1996)

Those are MY Private Parts
by Diane Hansen (Empowerment Productions, 2005)
Parents and care-givers can use this read-aloud rhyme as a tool to teach children sexual abuse prevention and empower their young children to say NO. Appropriate for ages 4-8.

Your Body Belongs To You
by Cornelia Spelman (Albert Whitman & Co., 2000)

When I Was Little Like You
by Jane Porett (CWLA Press, 2000)

Hotline

RAINN-The National Sexual Assault Online Hotline

Childhood Cancer and School

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Fact Sheets/ Articles

Childhood Cancer and School – Fact Sheet

Types of Children’s Cancer

Educational Issues Following Treatment for Childhood Cancer

Collaborating With Physicians: A Guide for School Leaders (NASP)

Potential 504 Accommodations for a Student Undergoing Treatment for Childhood Cancer or a Hematologic Disorder (PDF)

Helping Schools Cope With Childhood Cancer Current Facts and Creative Solutions

Tips for Teachers: Helping the Child with Cancer

• If possible, visit or call the child in the hospital or at home. Let them know you are thinking of them.

• Children will benefit from talking with teachers, parents, or hospital personnel in preparation for the return to school. They will cope far better knowing what to expect, and how to respond. They also need a chance to express their worries and concerns and to know how these will be addressed.

• Be alert to rumours on the school yard and attempt to dispel them as soon as possible. It may be helpful to have a standard response to inquiries, with approval from the family (e.g., “He’s getting excellent care and we are hopeful he will get well.”).

• Work with families and hospital staff to develop an educational program that will meet the child’s needs. Let the child know that you will help them continue with their education and stay connected with their friends.

• When the child returns to school designate a person who the child knows well as a “go to” person. This individual can check in with the child regularly, and be available if the student needs to let someone know they are physically or emotionally uncomfortable.

• Most children who attend school report that they just want to be treated like everyone else. As hard as it may be, try not to be overprotective. Normalize the child’s school experience as much as possible, while adjusting expectations when needed.

• When the child cannot attend for longer periods of time, establish regular contact with the parents or a liaison from the treatment centre. Plan ways that classmates can maintain regular contact with the child.

• Encourage a supportive classroom environment

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CureSearch for Children’s Cancer Series-  Guidance for school personnel

When You First Learn a Child in Your School Has Been Diagnosed with Cancer

Supporting a Child During Treatment

Supporting a Child’s Return to School

Guidance for Parents

LIVESTRONG at School program

The LIVESTRONG at School program uses national standards-based lessons to teach your students about the realities of cancer. While it is a difficult subject to talk about with kids, it is important for students to understand what cancer is and how it can be treated. In addition, this program informs your students about ways that they can make a difference and help those with cancer. The downloadable lessons and printable worksheets below make it easy for you to share this valuable information with your class.  Questions and Answers about Cancer

 LIVESTRONG at School, Grades K-2

LIVESTRONG at School, Grades 3-6

LIVESTRONG at School, Grades 7-8

LIVESTRONG at School, Grades 9-12

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Tackling Challenging Behaviors on the Playground/ Recess

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Wow Statistics!

Problem behavior in non-classroom settings (hallways, cafeteria, playground, common areas) accounts for 50% of all problem behavior in schools.                Colvin, Sugai, Good, & Lee (1997)

A study of four-year-old girls and boys revealed that attention to classroom tasks was greater following sustained outdoor play periods.
Holmes, R. M., Pellegrini, A. D., & Schmidt, S. L. (2006).

The results of one two-year study found that providing a safe play space (with
attendants to ensure safety) for inner-city schoolchildren resulted in 84% more
physically active children compared to children in a comparable neighborhood.
Parley, T. A., Meriwether, R. A., Baker, E. T., Watkins, L. T., Johnson, C. C., &
Webber, L. S. (2007).

A play program for 10- and 11-year old students consisting of a weekly two-hour, adult-guided session yielded significant increases in the students’ verbal creativity and graphic–figural creativity.
Garaigordobil, M. (2006).

Big Idea

Structuring playground or area-specific interventions should center around the development of pro-social skills not just reducing challenging behavior.                         Lewis, Powers, Kelk, & Newcomer (2002)

The Big Picture Articles/ Activities on Recess

A Comprehensive Guide to Effective Recess Implementation

Playground- Make recess a time of joy and learning

Recess Tool Kit

MAXIMIZING RECESS PHYSICAL ACTIVITY Written by: Aaron Beighle, Ph.D.

Teaching Transition Techniques for Promoting Success Between Lessons (Includes going and returning from recess)

Free Recess Related Webinars from Peaceful Playgrounds

Play and Recess -Prepared by – Jeffrey L. Charvat, PhD

A Recess Before Lunch Policy Implementation Guide

Playworks Lesson Plans 390 pages!

*Teaching with the Brain in Mind, 2nd Edition by Eric Jensen Chapter 4. Movement and Learning (Great read with research annotations – ASCD)*

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Make Zones

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Zone Resources

Fit & Fun Playscapes games stencils

School Playground Stencils

SCHOOL RECESS PARTNERS

Playworks – Why

PBIS Strategies

Whole School Lesson Plan on Recess Respect Lesson Plan

Teaching Recess

Good Example of expectations in different areas of the school

elemroar

Power Point

Success at Recess and Other Unstructured Times

RECESS TOOLS

RECESS PLANNING IN SCHOOLS A Guide to Putting Strategies for Recess into Practice – January 2017 CDC

Supervision Self-Assessment (PDF)f423bbff22619f1b8ce86b9f150c5ed8

Social Stories

Tons of Social Stories

Social Story (Source)

RECESS

After lunch we go to recess.

Sometimes recess is on the playground.

A lot of the children play on the playground equipment.

It is fun to play on the playground equipment.

Everyone should play safely.

When the whistle blows that means it is time to line up and go inside.

I will try to line up as soon as the whistle blows.

This will make my teachers happy.

After I line up I will try to stay in line.

Everyone will be proud of me!