ADEPT (Autism Distance Education Parent Training) Interactive Learning

adept

ADEPT (Autism Distance Education Parent Training) Interactive Learning

An original MIND Institute/CEDD 10-lesson interactive, self-paced, online learning module providing parents with tools and training to more effectively teach their child with autism and other related neurodevelopmental disorders functional skills using applied behavior analysis (ABA) techniques.

 

Resources

Autism Distance Education Parent Training (ADEPT) PPT Presented By: Patricia Schetter, MA, BCBA

Turn taking / Listening at School (Elementary)

“Be a good listener, your ears will never get you in trouble.” – Frank Tyger

“If speaking is silver, then listening is gold.” — Turkish saying

“I think the one lesson I have learned is that there is no substitute for paying attention.” — Diane Sawyer, newscaster

“One of the most sincere forms of respect is actually listening to what another has to say.” — Bryant McGill, author

turn-taking

Turn taking is a social skill that can take time to develop in young school aged children. By providing different opportunities to practice the skill the student in time will be more adept at using those skills in a social setting with peers and adults. This post will show some ideas for promoting Turn Taking.

TURN TAKING is a life skill necessary for social success in all environments. TURN TAKING is not a skill that develops naturally for many children. Many children need to be taught TURN TAKING skills and offered many opportunities to practice. Teaching TURN TAKING involves many skills such as: 1) a social understanding of why we share; 2) self-regulation skills; 3) what to do when I am waiting; and, 4) knowing when to take a turn. By preparing a child to learn about TURN TAKING you are setting them up for successful play with peers.

Source:HOW TO TEACH: “Turn Taking”

Social Stories

In the Classroom 

PREZI on Sharing and Turn Taking

Taking Turns at Circle (Word Document)

Activities

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Read: My Mouth is a Volcano by Julia Cook, (2005)

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Use this lesson to talk about blurting and interrupting.

Lesson Plan: Specific Skill: I Can Listen Attentively

Active Listening (for grades 3-6)

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Classroom Strategies

Using a Talking Stick

This is a method of enforcing turn-taking in conversation which is part of Native American lore and tradition.  Making simple Talking Sticks and using them can provide a fun and useful series of social skills lessons for young people on the autism spectrum.

Videos

 

Visuals

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Exploring feelings with your kids

Activities:

20 minute fun activities for parents and children that promote resilience by encouraging flexible thinking.

Emotional Intelligence Activities for Kids

Navigating Your Child’s Emotional Ups and Downs

Video:

Amygdala Hijack & Emotional Intelligence

How can we build flexibility into every day parenting?

  • Involve children in making decisions when possible.
  • Inventory the current needs to make a decision based on the present moment.
  • don’t get stuck on musts and should’s if something is not working don’t be afraid to change it.
  • Trust children to do things for themselves, even if it doesn’t turn out perfectly or quite how you wished it would.
  • Have routines for predictability not as a means to reward, punish or control.
  • Plan on extra time whenever possible so that special moments don’t have to be lost or abandoned all the time.
  • Ask questions and welcome cooperation instead of making demands.
  • Take time to care for yourself – you can only give as much love and care to others as you have for yourself! (That’s the elastic thing again – when we give too much we SNAP!)
  • Accept your child’s feelings as authentic expression, not something you must control or squash.
  • Dare to do things differently, be ridiculous and cultivate laughter – this will help you relax and let go!
  • Say YES when you can and say NO with kindness.

Source

Communication:

Improving Family Communications

Parent/Child Communication

Teaching Internet Safety

The internet, cell phones, and modern communication technology is a new area of learning for us parents. Especially, as it applies to our kids and their use of it communicating with others. What is your stance on monitoring, educating, and setting boundaries with these technologies in your family?

A great resource that I have use as a tool to help filter and understand this topic of teaching technology safety has been Common Sense Media.

Common Sense is dedicated to helping kids thrive in a world of media and technology.  We empower parents, teachers, and policymakers by providing unbiased information, trusted advice, and innovative tools to help them harness the power of media and technology as a positive force in all kids’ lives.

The Parent  Concern page on Common Sense Media really helped me understand how to get to answers for our family. Similarly the Advice page is informative as well.

For educators they offer a Digital Citizenship curriculum for K-12. Also content in Spanish.

Cell Phone Video

Set some ground rules with a Family Media contract.

Teen/ Tween Quiz and Games to educate on Digital literacy, Inappropriate content, Online privacy, Online predators, Cyberbullying. Estimated running time: 20 minutes.

Digital Compass is the only educational game that gives kids the freedom to explore how decisions made in their digital lives can impact their relationships and future.

Articles

Super Duper Article-Teaching Children Internet Safety by Becky L. Spivey, M.Ed

Technology is not ruining our kids. Parents (and their technology) are ruining them

CDC Tips

Working on Social Skills at Home

All parents want their kids to experience social success. Here are some strategies to help instill good social skills in your children.

Milestones

Milestones are important to reflect upon because you have to know first what is age appropriate.

Social Skills Milestones

By one:

  • smiles spontaneously
  • responds differently to strangers than to familiar people
  • pays attention to own name
  • responds to no
  • copies simple actions of others

Between ages one and two:

  • recognizes self in mirror or picture
  • refers to self by name
  • plays by self; initiates own play
  • imitates adult behaviors in play
  • helps put things away

Between ages two and three:

  • plays near other children
  • watches other children; joins briefly in their play
  • defends own possessions
  • begins to play house
  • symbolically uses objects, self in play
  • participates in simple group activity
  • knows gender identity

Between ages three and four:

  • joins in play with other children; begins to interact
  • shares toys; takes turns with assistance
  • begins dramatic play, acting out whole scenes

Between ages four and five:

  • plays and interacts with other children
  • dramatic play is closer to reality, with attention paid to detail, time, and space
  • plays dress-up
  • shows interest in exploring sex differences

Between ages five and six:

  • chooses own friends
  • plays simple table games
  • plays competitive games
  • engages in cooperative play with other children involving group decisions, role assignments, fair play

Learning Disabilities Association of America (1999)

Articles:

Improving Kids’ Social Skills

Parents Help to Encourage Social Success at Home, Too!

Social Skills for Children with ADHD

Tools

Great examples: Parents Promoting Emotional and Social Competence in Young Children

101 ways to teach social skills

Developing Social Emotional Intelligence in teens (13-18)

PBIS world resources

Social Skills e-book