Strengthening Positive Parenting Practices During a Public Health Crisis (NASP Article)

Latino Dads Improve Parenting Skills By Reading To Their Kids : Shots - Health News : NPR

Strengthening Positive Parenting Practices During a Public Health Crisis
— Read on https://www.nasponline.org/resources-and-publications/resources-and-podcasts/covid-19-resource-center/special-education-resources/strengthening-positive-parenting-practices-during-a-public-health-crisis

Link to PDF: Here

Strengthening Positive Parenting Practices During a Public Health Crisis

PART 1: INTRODUCTION

During these times of stress and uncertainty, it can feel like our worlds have been turned upside down. This is not only true of service providers, students, and teachers, but also the families we serve. We know that increased stressors including job insecurity, housing insecurity, and generalized anxiety regarding health can impact the wellness of all members of the family system. Similarly, when one member of a family group is experiencing distress, this can cause shifts in the behavior, thinking, and relatedness of other members of the system (Bowen, 1966; Boyd-Franklin & Bry, 2012). With great levels of stress, risky parenting behaviors may come to the fore. Cumulatively, these risky parenting behaviors—even when they do not rise to the level of reportable abuse or neglect—remain a significant societal problem, and the likelihood for it to increase may be exacerbated by global crises and stressors.

In most cases, parents are able to maintain safe parenting practices, even during difficult times. A lot of parents are feeling overwhelmed and emotionally exhausted. In fact, many feel like they are not being the kind of parents they want to be or typically are. One of the first steps we can take in building partnerships is to validate and normalize parents’ reactions and experiences. Reminding parents that their feelings are normal reactions to a very abnormal situation can be invaluable. Alternatively, some parents are experiencing extraordinary distress, and they may make parenting choices that are less than optimal. In these situations, there may be a need to recognize and respond to suspicions of child maltreatment. The first step in responding to risky parenting practices is to work to enhance parenting capacity, to help families succeed and thrive. Understanding that parents and caregivers desire and want to be better parents is instrumental in helping them succeed (Prevent Child Abuse North Carolina, 2018). One of the most important roles of the school psychologist in supporting families is to mitigate risk factors and enhance protective factors. Such a framework can decrease the likelihood of abuse, maltreatment, and neglect and help families thrive.

Increasing Protective Factors

  1. Parental Resilience: Parenting is hard and all parents will encounter crises at some point, but parents who can weather the challenges and bounce back have safer, healthier children. School psychologists can promote parental resilience through promoting basic problem-solving skills, providing crisis support as needed, and helping parents access needed resources and community supports.
  2. Social Connections: Parenting is much easier if parents don’t do it all alone. Having a support network is important for a person’s social and emotional needs. Parents connected to community and friends are better able to meet children’s needs. Promoting virtual or phone contact between parents and support networks can ease parental distress, and can support and strengthen healthy parenting practices.
  3. Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development: Knowing what milestones are coming and how to effectively deal with them help prepare parents to care for their children. Knowledge of parenting and child development is like having directions to find your destination rather than hoping the signs you need will be clear and visible.
  4. Concrete Support in Times of Need: We all need a hand now and then. Parents who have dependable support and are not afraid to turn to others for help are less likely to be involved in abuse and neglect. Thus, supporting parents in reaching out to community supports can strengthen parental well-being and improve child-rearing practices.
  5. Social and Emotional Competence of Children: Many of the activities professionals do with children promote a child’s ability to interact positively with others and parents’ ability to nurture that development. Giving a child language to express his or her emotions, role modeling how to respond sensitively to a child, and promoting attachment and bonding between parents and children are all ways to help prevent child maltreatment (Prevent Child Abuse North Carolina, 2018).

PART 2: THE ROLE OF THE SCHOOL PSYCHOLOGIST

Begin with asking, “What can I do?” Many of us are feeling equally overwhelmed by the unexpected stressors brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Reflect on how you have functioned in your role and consider how your skills can be best utilized given the limitations of remote learning. Developing your own professional action plan will help you address the mountain of need one pebble at a time, thus helping you be more effective in your work and at the same time reducing unnecessary stress and anxiety that can arise out of uncertainty.

Action Plan

  1. Reflect on the needs of your individual school and the children/families you serve.
  2. Consider your role and function as a school psychologist within the present societal context.
  3. Identify ways in which you can support families and children proactively.
  4. Identify ways in which you can support teachers or other school officials as they engage with their students.
  5. Create weekly benchmarks and regularly review whether you are making progress toward goals.

As schools operate through a remote learning format, school psychologists can support families in managing stressors through both prevention and intervention frameworks. Our unique skill set equips us to examine our schools from the perspective of individuals and communities and help identify and connect those in need with the support necessary to help families maintain their emotional health. Be a STAR during this challenging time, and use this parent training practice to support the families you are working with.

Teach Your Parents to Stop, Think, Act, and Reflect Parent Response/Feedback to the Activity
S Stop: (A) Have the parent identify when they are about to lose their temper with their kids. Coach the parent to take a brief break before responding to their children. (B) Ask the parent: What has been causing you to “lose your cool” recently in your interactions with your kid(s)? (A)

 

 

(B)

T Think: (A) Have the parent identify alternative manners to respond to challenging child behaviors. (B) Ask the parent: How can you respond differently to your child(ren) when they behave in ways you believe are inappropriate? (A)

 

(B)

A Act: Have the parent try out their new strategy. (A) How did things go when you tried your new strategy? (A)
R Reflect: Have the parent reflect on what went right and what can be improved when they tried out their new response to their children’s challenging behavior(s).(A) What can you do differently next time to more effectively parent your child(ren) when they are engaging in this challenging behavior(s)? (A)

PART 3: PRACTICAL ACTION STEPS

Parents want what is best for their children. Unfortunately, stress and stressors can get in the way and impede healthy parenting. The COVID-19 pandemic is resulting in huge stress for families. Direct and indirect fallout from the pandemic can sometimes result in parents interacting with their children in ways they may later regret. Here are some tips school psychologists can share with stressed out parents during these difficult times.

Assessing Parenting Stress Levels

How parents handle stress, including the fallout from COVID-19, can contribute to risky parenting behaviors. One way to help parents is to teach them self-monitoring of their distress. Parents can rate their stress level, through a simple thermometer metaphor. Teach parents to ask themselves: “On a scale of 1–10, how stressed out am I feeling at the moment?” Have the parent identify two or three simple coping skills they regularly use, which they could use quickly and easily to destress. This includes brief activities such as listening to music, playing a video game, or taking a walk in the backyard. Set up a system where parents complete this self-assessment a few times throughout the day. When stress levels are high, have parents use one of their identified coping skills. You can find a feelings thermometer and many useful cognitive–behavioral therapy (CBT) worksheets online here. Also, reputable CBT and psychoeducation worksheets that can be helpful when working with parents and families can be found here.

In addition to assessing current stress levels, there are other steps we can take to better understand and address the needs of the families school psychologists support. As we seek to support all families, it may become apparent that specific families need more direct care. Your parents may find websites on how to start an individual mindfulness practice or on parental mindfulness helpful. To better understand these specific contextual needs of our families, consider the following.

  1. Assess parent/family stress and resources: Conduct a brief needs assessment to identify primary areas of concern (food insecurity, housing insecurity, stress management, managing remote learning, family dynamics). A needs assessment is a systematic process to identify or determine family needs, and to identify barriers impeding access to needed resources. Identifying the discrepancy between the current condition and the desired one should be prioritized by you as the school psychologist, so that you can provide the tools and resources that can best mitigate the discrepancies between current and desired conditions.
  2. Safety Plan: Support the family in developing a safety plan. This plan should clearly describe challenges to safety of family members and steps that can be taken to manage threats to a parent or child’s safety. A safety plan is designed to mitigate threats to a family member’s safety using the least intrusive means possible. Here is an example of a safety plan.
  3. Check in: Identify school personnel or other individuals who can conduct regular meetings with the family to assess family temperature and continue to clarify strengths and needs. This could be school or community social workers, case workers, or a trusted professional or community member with the training and expertise to help strengthen families.

Promote Positive Communication

Good communication between parents and children is critical for developing a positive parent–child relationship and for subsequent development. If you notice coercive, concerning, or poor quality communication or parenting behaviors occurring in the family home, work with the parent(s) to emphasize basic parent training strategies. Basic parent training strategies you can share with parents you are working with include:

  1. Praise: Teach parents to praise their kids regularly for demonstrating a strong effort or doing something right. Remind the parents you are supporting that the more frequently they praise a behavior, the more likely it is their child will behave the same way again.
  2. Mindful Parenting: Promote the value of present moment engagement as it pertains to parent–child interactions. Emphasize to parents that providing their full attention to their children, to what is happening in the here-and-now, will help them better understand what their children are thinking and feeling, lessen disagreement, and strengthen the parent–child bond.
  3. Active Listening: Active listening is a useful tool to promote positive parenting practices. When school psychologists provide psychoeducation on active listening, parents learn how to listen, both verbally and nonverbally, to strengthen their relationships with their children and others. Providing psychoeducation to parents regarding how to reflect back the words, sentiments, or emotions expressed by the child can make active listening particularly effective in promoting communication.
  4. Child-Led Play or Special Time Together: Reinforce to parents the power of time spent together with their children. Regular (even short) periods of play with younger children or parent–child activities with older children and adolescents can strengthen communication and the overall parent–child relationship.
  5. Ignoring: Ignoring can help quickly end attention-seeking behaviors such as whining or tantrums. Ignoring is an active practice. This will require ongoing work and support with parents. However, teaching parents to ignore attention seeking behaviors can help end challenging behaviors by the child early, before they escalate and cause upheaval within the household. You as the school psychologist should work with the parent to teach them how to remove attention from the child and the negative behavior(s) they are exhibiting, to promote stress and relaxation within the household.

PART 4: INTENSIVE AND INDIVIDUALIZED INTERVENTION

Even with robust support and interventions in place, there is a possibility that a small portion of the populations we serve may need more intensive interventions. The number of families who are engaging in risky parenting behaviors and who are at risk for engaging in child maltreatment or abuse may increase during times of global crisis. Intensive, individualized interventions—either immediately or at a later date—may be necessary for some families. When appropriate, the school psychologist may be able to provide these services directly. Your role also may include consultation and referral of the family to more focused and specialized clinical and community-based supports. While there are a wide range of choices to consider in intensive interventions, a sample of evidence-based interventions that may have utility in supporting families in distress who may be engaging in risky parenting behaviors include the following.

Interventions Focused on Young Children Birth to Age 5

  1. Attachment and Biobehavioral Catch-up (ABC)
  2. Child–Parent Psychotherapy (CPP)
  3. Parent–Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT)
  4. Multidimensional Treatment Foster Care for Preschoolers (MTFC)
  5. The Incredible Years* (IY)
  6. Triple-P* (PPP)

*Modules and research also support these programs with older children (i.e., middle childhood and adolescence).

Interventions Focused on Middle Childhood and Adolescence

  1. Trauma-Focused Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy
  2. Alternatives for Families: A Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy
  3. Multisystemic Therapy – for Child Abuse and Neglect
  4. DBT Skills

PART 5: ENSURING CHILD AND FAMILY SAFETY

The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting families in unalterable ways. For many families, loss of employment, social isolation, and myriad other challenges brought forward through the pandemic are increasing family distress. These challenges will likely continue and possibly even worsen in the coming months. School psychologists will encounter family dynamics in new and profound manners through teletherapy. While most encounters will be adaptive, healthy, or even humorous, others may expose the school psychologist to the escalating stress and challenges experienced by many families. At times such unwitting encounters may even result in school psychologists who witness events, interactions, or behaviors that rise to the level of a reportable offense. Remember, as school psychologists we are all mandated reporters. Thus, we must be prepared to contact our statewide child protective services office should we observe anything in the home through teletherapy services that raises a reasonable suspicion of child maltreatment.

Parents and families generally want what is best for their children. When parents and caregivers are under duress, their ability to engage in healthy parenting practices may decline. It is important that we consider the robust and broad risk and protective factors that may impact child rearing and caregiving capabilities. During times of global health or related crises, such as COVID-19, school psychologists play a key role in strengthening families. With their breadth and depth of knowledge, school psychologists must strive to use their skills to promote healthy parenting behaviors.

RESOURCES: Help and Safety Contacts/Hotlines

References

Boyd-Franklin, N., & Bry, B. H. (2012). Reaching out in family therapy: Home-based, school, and community interventions. Guilford Press.

Bowen, M. (1966). The use of family theory in clinical practice. Comprehensive psychiatry, 7(5), 345–374.

Prevent Child Abuse, North Carolina. (2018). Recognizing and Responding to Suspicions of Child Maltreatment: A Training for Adults Working with Children and Families. (Retrieved from https://preventchildabusenc-lms.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/RR-full_2018.pdf)

Contributors: Kirby Wycoff, Michele Messer, and Aaron Gubi

Please cite as: National Association of School Psychologists. (2020). Strengthening positive parenting practices during a public health crisis [handout]. Author.

© 2020, National Association of School Psychologists, 4340 East West Highway, Suite 402, Bethesda, MD 20814, 301-657-0270, http://www.nasponline.org

The School Health Assessment and Performance Evaluation (SHAPE) System

The SHAPE System | University of Maryland School of Medicine

My friend and colleague sent the SHAPE system website to me and I was impressed with all the features it has to offer. While I have only scraped the surface of the site it offers assessments to help students as well as identify ways to improve your school or district Mental Health system via a report (sample report). Here is the website: here.

About

The School Health Assessment and Performance Evaluation (SHAPE) System is a public-access, web-based platform that offers schools, districts, and states a workspace and targeted resources to support school mental health quality improvement. SHAPE was developed by the National Center for School Mental Health (NCSMH), in partnership with the field, to increase the quality and sustainability of comprehensive school mental health systems. SHAPE houses the National School Mental Health Census and the School Mental Health Quality Assessment (SMH-QA). These measures are designed for team completion at the school or district level to document the school mental health system components, assess the comprehensiveness of a SMH system, prioritize quality improvement efforts, and track improvement over time.

Their Mission

The SHAPE System is hosted by the National Center for School Mental Health (NCSMH) at the University of Maryland School of Medicine. The NCSMH is committed to enhancing understanding and supporting the implementation of comprehensive school mental health policies and programs that are innovative, effective, and culturally and linguistically competent across the developmental spectrum (from preschool through post-secondary), and three tiers of mental health programming (promotion, prevention, intervention).

The mission of the NCSMH is to strengthen policies and programs in school mental health to improve learning and promote success for America’s youth.

From its inception in 1995, the Center’s leadership and interdisciplinary staff have promoted the importance of providing mental health services to children, adolescents, and families directly in schools and communities.

 

 

Dr. Ross Greene’s Magical Problem Solving Approach For Unsolved Problems In Youth

Dr. Ross Greene’s sophisticated yet simple approach melds process and empathy to find solutions to unsolved problems. Start with a Walking Tour for Parents or Educators to get acquainted with the process.

Overview

It starts with an assessment called the ASSESSMENT OF LAGGING SKILLS & UNSOLVED PROBLEMS (ALSUP) to focus on what is to be discussed on a solution sheet to develop a Plan B. The Plan B process has a Cheat Sheet to follow in order to elicit effective solutions.

Plan B Steps

five finger

Ross Greene’s Five-Finger Strategy Word Document

Here are a FAQ and a link to the CPS website for additional information.

Resource Packet

Film

Documentary Film The Kids We Lose

Youtube Lectures by Dr. Ross Greene – Here

Two Minute Videos

Additional Languages

Many of these instruments have been translated into other languages:

 

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Danish
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Dutch

Finnish
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French

Italian
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German

Japanese
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Norwegian

Polish

Russian
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Spanish
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Swedish

Vietnamese

COVID-19 Resources for Parents of Children with Intellectual or Other Developmental Disabilities – From The STRYDD Center

Overview PDF

A Guide For Families with A Child with An Intellectual and/orDevelopmental Disability During the Covid-19 Pandemic
From The STRYDD Center–Supporting Trauma Recovery for Youth with Developmental Disabilities
Long Island Jewish Medical Center, Northwell Health System
April, 2020
To support your child who has special needs during this time:
1. Help your child understand the changes that are happening. Give your child opportunities to express concerns. Children’s understanding of the challenges we are all experiencing and the changes to their routine will vary depending on their age, developmental status, and special needs issues. Younger children may have worries based on concrete reasoning and beliefs. Young children have a tendency to be “egocentric” in the sense of overestimating the child’s own role in “causing” events. For example, a 6-year-old wondered whether her having had a non-coronavirus illness was why no one could go to her school. An older child may develop misunderstandings based on “all-or-nothing” thinking, such a boy’s belief that because of his (mild) asthma if infected with COVID-19 he would certainly die. Sometimes teens with cognitive delays pass misunderstandings back and forth within their peer group (even if they are only communicating remotely). At all ages, children may have some misunderstandings that need clarifying. We will provide resources available at various developmental levels to explain and reinforce understanding of current changes.
Some general principles:
 Give your child an opportunity to express feelings, ask questions, and voice concerns.
 Some children may not use words to express concerns, but their play or drawings may provide strong clues, such as when a child starts acting out stories about people being sick when the child had not been doing this previously. For some children, expression of concerns is less direct but will be shown in behavior changes (as discussed further below).
 In addressing concerns, choose a time and place that works for you and your child. If you can, address simple questions when your child brings them up, but it is ok to let the child know you will talk further later. For some children, having a regular time and place will help them develop awareness of thoughts and feelings that they may not think of otherwise. For these children, a visual calendar may help keep this routine as well as reduce anxieties about what comes next in the day or week. (See below re: routines.)
 Give accurate information, but at your child’s level of understanding. Use concrete language for young children, those with cognitive delays, and those with difficulty with abstract language. When possible, do this in a conversation that allows you to check what your child has understood and follow up over time.
 Be honest. It is ok to let your child know when you do not have answers (such as, when school will open). Share that you will let your child know when you find out.
 For some children, visual support such as a simple social story can be helpful. Also, consider using resources developed in a variety of mediums such as children’s books, simple videos developed to address specific issues and children’s toys to illustrate and to help your child understand. (We provide COVID-19 related stories in our resource materials.) For a child who demonstrates concerns in play, you may also be able to respond, at least initially, in that medium. For example, for the child who is acting out themes about people getting sick, depending on the situations to which the child was exposed, you might role play actions a family member or a doctor takes to help people who are sick get better. You could also read a book or share through words the actions people take. Use materials at your child’s level of understanding that also fit your child’s preferred communication style. For example, a young teen with significant cognitive delay was very proud of his reading skills. He loved reading books designed for much younger children that used pictures and words to address concerns. In contrast, a boy with a significant reading disability and language processing issues was not interested in looking at most of those books, declaring them to be “for babies,” but would talk about issues when they could be related to sports—an area in which he excelled.
 Limit your child’s exposure to media discussions and adult conversations about COVID-19. The information may be confusing to young children and those with cognitive delays—and too much exposure is likely to heighten anxiety. Try to check what your child heard and what the child understood. Clarify misperceptions and address concerns. Remember that “out of sight is not necessarily “out of earshot.” For example, a parent who was talking on the phone about the illness of a family friend thought she was having an “adult only” conversation since her
children were in a different room; she was startled when her daughter asked a little later how the friend was doing. There is more opportunity for this to happen during periods of COVID-19 “sheltering in place” with many parents and children at home when they would have been at work or school.
2. Consider the changes your child is experiencing. Changes may include losses such as limited contact with important people (for example, grandparents or significant providers), or lost opportunities for activities to which your child was looking forward. Try to help your child with strategies for compensating when this is possible—and remind your child that many of the changes are time-limited.
3. Maintain structure and routines.
 Try to maintain routines for your child. Build on old ones when practical, establish new ones when necessary. This helps establish some predictability in a changing world. For example, a mother reported that her family’s days were working better when she restructured “shelter in place” weekdays to follow the family’s school day morning routines about getting dressed, eating, and then going to a specific place set up for learning (but in her house rather than the school building). You know your own child and your child’s best balance between structure and flexibility. To the extent possible, try to honor this.
 In planning your family schedule, do take into account needs of all family members—including your own!
4. Support emotional expression and emotional coping skills. Acknowledge and accept your child’s feelings—for example, saying that you can understand that your child might be sad (about missing someone the child cannot see or something the child cannot do) or might be frightened by some part of the situation. The resource materials provide many suggestions for aiding emotional expression and coping. Tailor them to your child’s skills and preferences. For example, the mother
of a ten-year-old boy who has autism noticed that her son—although very verbal–could express feelings and talk about them more readily when he could draw simple illustrations (often with simple cartoon-like stick figures). He made a poster of strategies he knew, including ones developed with his school counselor, to help him calm down and then was able to discuss which ones would work best at home.
5. Remember that all behavior is communication. If you are seeing an increase in behavioral problems such as irritability, a return to less mature behaviors, disruption in sleep or eating patterns, or physical complaints that on checking do not seem to have a physical basis, consider the following:
 Is there something in the current situation that is confusing or frightening to your child? (Please see first section on talking with your child).
 Is the behavior, although seeming like a step backwards, actually a request for reassurance that can be ok (on a temporary basis) for this situation—such as a child who had been sleeping on her own seeking the reassurance of coming into her parents’ bed?
 How are you doing with providing some structure and routines for your child?
 How are you doing with self-care? Your needs are very important and should be balanced with those of your child. Most children will pick up on and react to a parent’s level of stress.
Manage your own anxiety – breathe, take a break, talk to someone, don’t expect too much of yourself or your child at this time.
6. Cope with the move—at least temporarily—to a virtual world for education and many resources.
 On-line access: We provide information about a resource for families with limited on-line access.
 Education: With many school systems moving at least temporarily to virtual learning, parents are reporting a range of experiences for their children who are supposed to receive educational accommodations or related services such as speech therapy or occupational therapy.
 If you have access to your providers, please work with them on expectations and guidance for services for your child. Discuss any special issues you may be having, such as dealing with your child’s understanding of or compliance with on-line learning.
 If you do not have access to your providers, we list and briefly describe some of the many sites that provide support for structured learning activities.
 Educational entitlement: As of April 2020, schools that are providing instruction are still required to provide accommodations for your child’s special needs, as specified on IEPs and 504 plans—although there is discussion of possible future “waivers” (at least temporary changes in some of the rules). We provide links regarding educational rights and issues.
 Other services you may be receiving: Your child may have been receiving Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) services, or your family may be entitled to other in-home services. Check with  your service providers about what they are able to offer, which can depend on a range of factors. Some in-home services are considered “essential services” that may be provided during social distancing, when providers are available. Some providers may be able to provide “virtual” (on-line) consultation during social distancing. Know your rights. (See information under educational access in the accompanying resource list).
7. Reinforce your child’s skill development—by everyday activities as well as formal learning.
8. Maintain socialization and social skills
 Encourage “play dates” or check-ins via video meeting software or other means, where possible.
 Use appropriate cautions concerning supervision of children’s interactions online including online gaming – there is a great deal of socializing going on right now. Children with disabilities can be teased, bullied, or manipulated – they may also obtain much needed social
support on such platforms. This might mean supervising or considering parental controls to monitor/control access to sites. See Parents’ Ultimate Guide to Parental Controls.
9. When needed, get information about how to deal with children’s health issues, including special health care needs in the current context: Many children with disabilities have special health care needs. Dealing with these needs can be challenging and may be more stressful during the pandemic. We provide resources to help address this issue.
10. Support your child with serious illness or death of a loved one: Your family may be experiencing the loss of people who have played an important role in your child’s life—such as a parent, grandparent, or extended family member, or teachers and other significant individuals. This can have a strong effect on children—including very young children and those with significant delays. We provide material on addressing your child’s response to separation, illness and loss.
11.Parent self-care: You are responding to your child with special needs in the context of your family’s other challenges. In addition to ongoing individual and family needs, many parents are coping with new work challenges (such as working at home, risks as an “essential worker,” or loss of work), financial uncertainties and hardships, and/or illness and loss of loved ones. Remember that taking care of yourself is critical for being able to also respond to your child’s needs. We provide
resources that address issues of self-care and balancing needs.

Resources

COVID-19 Resources for Parents of Children with Intellectual or Other Developmental Disabilities PDF

SEL THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING FROM IFSEL

IFSEL’s RESOURCE LIST TO SUPPORT

SEL THROUGH DISTANCE LEARNING

We hope the following curated list of curriculum materials, articles, blogs, poetry and other resources will give you practical tools, inspiration, ideas, research, and more to empower you to support the emotional health and wellbeing of your community while keeping alive the SEL in virtual classrooms. We’ve done our best to divide the resources into categories. Most of what you will find here is relevant for K-12  and also for the adults and families in your communities. 

RESOURCES FOR SCHOOLS 

A New REALM – IFSEL’s Tips for Distance Learning Blog (IFSEL)

Weekly “Teach Meets” hosted by IFSEL

Don’t Worry about Academic Learning Lost from Covid (American Institute of Learning and Human Development

A Trauma Informed Approach to Teaching Through Coronavirus (Teaching Tolerance)

Online Team-Building Games Guide (Michelle Cummings)

Laughter, Learning, and Why Teens are such a Tough Crowd (Edutopia)

Wide Open School (Curated Resources from Common Sense Media)

The Discomfort You’re Feeling is Grief   (Harvard Business Review)

Mindfulness for Zoom Exhaustion  (Mindful)

Why Learning at Home should be more Self Directed and Less Structured (Edutopia)

Living History Journal  (Cathryn Stout)

4 Tips for Teachers Switching to Online Learning (Edutopia)

NAIS: Tips for setting up Temporary Distance Learning at Your School (National Association of Independent Schools)

Resource Hub for Remote Learning for Special Education Students (Education Weekly)

Elementary Ideas for Students at Home (We are Teachers)

What Teachers in China Have Learned in the Past Month (Edutopia)

Supporting Gender Expansive Kids in Times of Covid-19 (Gender Spectrum has multiple resources for youth, parents and educators. Please share with all students because you may not know who is transgender or non-binary.)

What Trans People Need to Know re: Coronavirus (Transgender Equality Project)

Flexibility in the Midst of Crisis (Psychology Today)

Overall Tips and LInks to Online Learning Resources (Hong Kong Academy)

Online Learning Resources for Teachers (Common Sense Media)

Learning from Home Resources (New Schools)

Insights for Online Learning (Teach for All)

What do we need to teach now? (Inside Higher Ed)

Coping with Disrupted Routines (Christine Carter)

Ok Go Videos and behind the scenes

Go Noodle!

RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS:

Letter from Teacher to High School Seniors

Covid 19 Toolkit – for Teenagers and Parents (Stressed Teens)

Regulating Emotions in a Covid-19 World (Tom Hollenstein)

Just For Kids: A Comic Exploring The New Coronavirus  (NPR)

Free Mindfulness Classes for Elementary Students (Mindful Schools)

Kids Around the World are Reading NPRs Coronavirus Comic  NPR

When Xenophobia Spreads Like A Virus – Codeswitch by NPR

The Social Distancing Cardio Workout (No Equipment))

Coronavirus: Protect Yourself and Stand Against Racism  (Facing History)

Brainpop Video re: Coronavirus

RESOURCES FOR FAMILIES  

How to have Family Meetings to Solve Conflict during Lockdown  (NY Times)

5 Killers of Your Child’s Creativity geared towards life during SIP – Institute for Learning and Human Development

How to Help Teen Shelter in Place (Christine Carter)

How to Help Pre-Teens in the Coronavirus Lockdown (Quartz)

The National Association of School Psychologist (NASP)- Guidelines for talking with children about COVID-19. (NASP)

How to Talk to Kids About Corona Virus  (New York Times)

Coronavirus, Wildfires, Oh My: What to Say to a Child Who’s Scared By the News,  (Steve Calechman)

Stigma and Resilience (CDC)

Mental Health and Coping During COVID-19 (CDC)

Keeping Learning in Challenging Times  (International School of Beijing)

Supporting kids academically during home learning  (Lisa Oefinger)

How to Talk to Kids and Teens About the Coronavirus – (Psychology Today)

Common Sense Media Resources for Parents re: Online Learning

Hand in Hand Parenting – Supporting Children during Sheltering In

Friendship Is Crucial to the Adolescent Brain (The Atlantic)

Using Social & Emotional Learning in Times of Stress (CDC)

Virus Anxiety (Take Care)

Stop Romanticizing Lockdown; it’s a Mental Health Crisis in the Making (Elephant Journal)

EQUITY AND INCLUSION

Speaking up against Racism during Coronavirus (Teaching Tolerance)

What about Children who are Disconnected? (Brookings)

When Xenophobia Spreads Like A Virus – Codeswitch by NPR

Coronavirus: Protect Yourself and Stand Against Racism  (Facing History)

What Trans People Need to Know re: Coronavirus (Transgender Equality Project)

A Trauma Informed Approach to Teaching Through Coronavirus (Teaching Tolerance Magazine)

Supporting Gender Expansive Kids in Times of Covid-19 (Gender Spectrum has multiple resources for youth, parents and educators. Please share with all students becuase you may not know who is transgender or non-binary.)

Social Distancing is a Privilege  (Optionon: Charles Bow)

GENERAL EDUCATION RESOURCES  

ReflEQ  – SEL and meta-skills for subject teaching 

Resources for Learning at Home (Captain Planet) – Nature and Science

Biomimicry Youth Challenge

PE with Coach Wood YouTube

Art at Home

Storycorps

Museum Virtual Tours

Wow in the World (NPR Podcast)

Podcasts 

Brains On: Forever Ago

Broadway Plays, etc. 

INSPIRATION

“Pandemic” (Poem by Lynn Unger)

Creating a Home Retreat: Finding Freedom Wherever you Are (Jack Kornfield)

Encouraging Songs of Comfort amid Global Crisis  (Yo Yo Ma)

A Steady Heart in the Time of Coronavirus (Video Tara Brach & J. Kornfield)

Compassion in the time of Coronavirus (Jack Kornfield)

Poems for Shelter in Place (Poets.org)

More COVID 19 Family and Educator Resources

Family/Educator Resources

Social-Emotional Support for Students

Social Stories

  • The Yucky Bug – Link
  • My Coronavirus Story – Easterseals – Link
  • Time to Come In, Bear: A Children’s Story about Social Distancing – Link
  • YouTube Channel with various social stories – Link
    • The New Rules of Keeping My Body in the Group and Out of the Group
    • The Rules of Wearing a Mask
    • Rules! Rules! Rules! Rules for Learning Online!
    • When My Parents are Working From Home
    • My Home is My School
  • Video Chatting – A New Way to Communicate Link
    • Social story to describe video chatting, related emotions, and conversation starters

Social-Emotional Learning 

  • Social Thinking – Free Stuff to Use and Home and School – Link
    • Free resources on social skills and how to teach them! 
      • Read Aloud Books and Thinksheets
      • Video Lessons
      • Free Articles 
      • Free Webinars and Aha! Moments to Teach or Core Concepts and Products
    • New added resources each week!
  • Second Step Social-Emotional Learning Curriculum – Link
    • Free social-emotional learning resources for mental health professionals, educators, and parents to support skill-building for themselves and/or students 

Coping – Parent and Staff Guides

  • Large-Scale Natural Disasters: Helping Children Cope – Link
    • Handout – How to support children
  • Parent/Caregiver Guide to Helping Families Cope with the Coronavirus Disease 2019
  • Age-Related Reactions to a Traumatic EventLink
  • Supporting Children During Coronavirus (COVID19) – Link
  • Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Community Organizations and LeadersLink
  • Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Youth High School and College AgeLink
  • Coping in Hard Times: Fact Sheet for Parents – Link
  • Pandemic Flu Fact Sheet: A Parents’ Guide to Helping Families Cope with a Pandemic Flu
  • Helping Children Cope with Changes Resulting from COVID-19
  • Anxiety: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Depression: Helping Handout for Home – Link
  • Sleep Problems: Helping Handout for Home – Link
  • Addressing Grief – Link
    • Brief Facts and Tips, and Related Resources
  • Grief: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link

Healing After Disasters

  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping Adolescents after Disasters – Link
  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping Infants and Toddlers after Disasters – Link
  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping Preschool-Age Children after Disasters – Link
  • PFA: Parent Tips for Helping School-Age Children after Disasters – Link
  • After a Crisis: Helping Young Children Heal – Link

Educational Activities and Supports

Lessons/ Activities

  • My 2020 COVID-19 Time CapsuleLink
    • Printable activity book for kids!
  • Simple Activities for Children and Adolescents – Link
  • Seesaw – Remote Learning – Link
    • Trainings/PD and Resources
  • BrainPOP – Remote LearningLink
    • Lessons and Activities for various subjects
  • Epic! – Remote Learning Link
    • Parent and educator access
    • Books, learning videos, quizzes and more

Teaching Students about Coronavirus – Videos and Fact Sheets

  • Coronavirus Outbreak: How to protect yourself – Kids Learning Cartoon – Dr. Panda Tototime – Link
  • What is Coronavirus? Coronavirus Outbreak  – The Dr. Binocs Show – Peekaboo Kidz – Link
  • Talking to Children About Coronavirus: A Parent Resource
    • English
    • Spanish
    • Amharic, Chinese, Korean, French, Vietnamese, Bahasa, and Udu available on:

Parent/Guardian Distance Learning Supports

  • Parent Guide – Creating a Home Learning Environment (Handout) – Link
  • Daily Schedule (Blank, Printable)Link
  • Engagement and Motivation: Helping Handout for Home – Link
  • Using Praise and Rewards Wisely: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link

Self-Care for Adults

  • Free Guide to Living with Worry and Anxiety Amidst Global Uncertainty – Psychology Tools (Adults) – Link
    • Offered in many languages!
  • Self-Care: Dangers of “motivational” pressure – Link
  • Staff ResourcesLink
    • Self-Care Strategies, Meditation and Mindfulness, Free Exercise Opportunities, Arts and Entertainment, and Free Educational Opportunities!
  • Teacher Survival Tips – Dealing with Physical Distancing (Short Handout)Link
  • Care For Your Coronavirus Anxiety ToolkitLink
    • Online toolkit/website with information and activities (e.g., meditations) to address anxiety
  • That Discomfort You’re Feeling is Grief  – Harvard Business Review Article Link
  • Teacher NewsletterLink
    • Tips for Managing Stress and Anxiety (for you, students, or parents)
    • Talking about COVID-19 With Students
    • Examples of Child-Friendly Language You Can Use about COVID-19
  • FACE COVID – How to respond effectively to the Corona crisis (e-book) – Link
  • Wellness: 6 tips for taking care of yourself during this stressful time – Link
  • Taking Care of Yourself – Link
  • Coping with the COVID-19 Crisis: The Importance of Care for Caregivers – Tips for Administrators and Crisis Teams – Link
  • Care for Caregivers: Tips for Families and Educators – Link
  • Support for Teachers Affected by Trauma (STAT) Training Program Link
    • Geared toward pre-k through 12th grade teachers
    • Five online modules that explore the concepts of secondary trauma, risk factors associated with susceptibility to STS, the impact of STS across multiple life domains, and tangible self-care skills.
    • Self-paced training 

Distance Learning Supports (Teachers/Staff)

  • Learning and Teaching Online and From HomeLink
    • Expert advice, tips, and resources from Connections Academy online school educators
  • Using Praise and Rewards Wisely: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Anxiety: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Grief: Helping Handout for School and Home – Link
  • Seesaw – Remote Learning – Link
    • Trainings/PD and Resources
  • BrainPOP – Remote LearningLink
    • Lessons and Activities for various subjects

Addressing Harassment and Bullying

  • US Department of EducationLink
    • Letter and resources to address stereotyping, harassment and bullying
  • Countering Coronavirus Stigma and Racism: Tips for Teacher and Other Educators – Link
  • Countering Coronavirus Stigma and Racism: Tips for Parent and Caregivers

Crisis Supports

Suicide

  • Comprehensive School Suicide Prevention in a Time of Distance Learning – Link
  • Preventing Youth Suicide: Tips for Parents and Educators
  • Suicidal Thinking and Threats: Helping Handout for Home – Link

Emergency Management and Response

  • Readiness and Emergency Management for Schools (REMS)Link
    • Guidance, resources, tools, and training 
  • The PREPaRE Model, Crisis Intervention, and Global Pandemic –

Source

Source found on FaceBook: Copy of Family and Educator Resources for COVID-19 (PDF)